(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Norther"

THE UNIVERSITY 

OF ILLINOIS 

LIBRARY 

C 

II 16 noP 

V.20 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/norther920deka 







• 



Girouph the years has each 
senior class made record iri 
the Dorther of tbe passino 
egearct of the year at the 
orthern 8 Hinois- State 
formal ocboo!j/ow we, 
the class_pf IJineteen 
Hundred CWnty, con_ 
tribate o&r share to this 
ever enletrpino record, in 
oar book -vola m<z twenty— 
which sets forth _ 
the Stage 
the f|:tors 
the PI av 
of the present school year 





fcv.B. 



451494 



All tbe scbooFs a stage 

Anb all tlje scbool folk merely players. 

(they Ijau? tbrir exits anb tbeir entrances. 

Attn ttt tlyiB play at formal land, 

©l|pre are tbe seuen stages. At first tbe rljilo, 

Ulayuiarb anb playful in tbe training srljonls; 

©tjen ttye guileless freshman, witty persistence, 

i£uer working towarb ttyat far anb wortby eni» — 

SEtye Sfnrtbern formal stjeepskin. Anb tljen tlye junior 

Digging at times, but neuer neglerting 

3His rlyanre for fun. 2Etjen tlye senior, 

Jffull of great knouilebge, experienreb in teart|ing, 

Acquiring a strange anb useful bignity, 

Peeking tb/e bubble reputation, 

Breaming by nigljt of positions. Anb ttjen tlje critic 

Ulitlj betaileb plans, anb criticisms just — 

2lut euer reaby witb sympatby true, 

iFull of mise saws anb mnbern instances; 

££>l}£ helps tlje senior to teacb- ®be sixtlj stage follows 

Anb b^ce me finb learneb instructors 

fEacb mitb b* s b°bhy, enjoyeb by tbe otbers — 

passing on knomlebge, giuing time freely — 

All for tbe goob of tbe spool's great name — 

Suspiring in stubents unknomn f aitb anb looe — 

A noble task fulfilling. Slast stage of all, 

fls tbe alumnus, mbo appears before tbe worlb 

§nna fear, sans f oolisbness, sans boxtbt, sans ignorance. 



TO OUR PRESIDENT 

DR. J. STANLEY BROWN 

IN APPRECIATION OF 

HIS SINCERITY 

AND PROGRESSIVENESS 

WE DEDICATE OUR NORTHER 
VOLUME TWENTY 




BoaRDOFCBascees 



Francis CO. Shepardson, 6x Officio 

President Springfield 

Fanns G. Blair, €x Officio 

Secretary Springfield 

JchnCMm 

Rdand Bridges 

Frank B.Stitt 

Charles L.Capen 

Lerqy FT.Coddard 

Henry ET.Deal 

William B.Owen 

Frank CRichey 

Qroer C WalKer 




OOonrnoatb 
Carbondale 

ClPaso 
Blooroington 

Chicago 

Charleston 

Chicago 

La Salle 

COacomb 



PAGE NINE 



CHG DORCHGR BOflftP 



Editor-m-cbie/^ 
Assistant Editor 
Business FTlanader 
Assistant manager 
Assistant IDanaper 
Art Editor 
Assistant Editor 

Literary Editor 
Organization Editor 
Women's At bletic Edi 
[Deo's Athletic Editor 
Calendar Editor 
Barbs Editor 



Helen Corey 

fT)ar ion Davis 

Vs?i I lard Smith 

Sidney Bristow 

Frank Dadds 

El vera Hjertstedt 

Dor tby Bristol 

Rutb IT)iller 

Ularparet fT] c Adam 

tor Ruth Poles? 

Claude Ulidd leton 

lla Rice 

Rutb Johnson 




PAGE TEN 







PAGE ELEVEN 




cHe scace 




When green buds are 

bursting, 
Sheer joy us awaits, 
While bird-notes thrill 

sweetly 
Within thy fair gates. 



Meek violets with jon- 
quils 
And daffodils gay 
Join voices and fragrance 
To breathe, "It is May." 
Hildur Flodin. 



PAGE FIFTEEN 




In grove and in forest, 
'Neath green leafy trees, 
The flow'rets bloom 

sweetly 
And nod in the breeze. 
Each nook of your dear 

land, 
Our school home, we love 
From tiny green blades 
To the blue sky above. 

Hildur Flodin. 



PAGE SIXTEEN 




The entrance with its spacious archways, 
Its columns massive, strong, and tall, 

Its parapets in ivy shrouded, 

Has a stately beauty that charms us all. 



Nina Wheeler. 



PAGE SEVENTEEN 




PAGE EIGHTEEN 



ft 



MS1&4: 




You were our home for two short years. 

You reflected our gladness, sheltered our tears. 

And the memories that dwell your broad roof beneath, 

Are as fresh and as sweet as your own bridal wreath ! 

Nora Tully. 



PAGE NINETEEN 



a= 



i4iy 



dH 




How we love thy towers tall, 
Griffins, ivy, walls and all. 
Everything thou dost enfold 
In thy walls so grim and old. 



Helen Larson. 



PAGE TWENTY 



a: 



I I 



& 9 



JW^JSWpH 



* 




The leaves now 

Are falling 

From bush and from 

tree ; 
The flowers their petals 
Have shed on the lea; 
The wind through thy 

bowers 
Sing, weirdly, but still 
We love every bower 
Of our school on the hill. 

Hildur Flodin. 



PAGE TWENTY-ONE 



t t 



9 



It 



MiltiMfi 



'Neath white now lie 
sleeping 

Thy hill and thy vale, 

And blossoms are dream- 
ing 

That bloomed in thy dale. 

Thy meadows in sun- 
light 

Each clear frosty day 

Are sprinkled with jew- 
els. 

In dazzling array. 

Hildur Flodin. 



iff 





PAGE TWENTY-TWO 



It 



I I 



MiJ^4 



s 




When north winds 
O'er meadow 
And still brooklet blow, 
And scatter the fleecy, 
The beautiful snow, 
Dear land of our dream- 
ing 
We've loved thee before, 
But in thy new beauty 
We love thee still more. 

Hildur Flodin. 



eto 



lW 1 A< l 



VtM'\K 



a^ .=■ i 



y%^ 



PAGE TWENTY-THREE 



©lilts tlje panorama of tlje stage was set forttj: 
(gorge mis in tlje season of tlje barberry; 
(glistening In tlje snn of Ijnary winter; 
Heroant in tlje oays of brimming brook, 
Cooling In tlje Ijot, still days of snmnter — 
'©is a fit setting for tlje players ano tlje play. 




CHe access 



B: 



i i 



Mik=i 



a 



=s 




F. R. RITZMAN, A. B. 

Director of the Department of 

Training* 



J. STANLEY BROWN 
President 

NEWELL D. GILBERT, A. M. 
Dean 



PAGE TWENTY-SEVEN 



I 1 



B= 



MttM 




SWEN FRANKLIN PARSON 
Professor of Mathematics 



ANNE PARMELEE 

Assistant in Mathematics 



MARY ROSS WHITMAN, A. B. 

Professor of Ancient and 
Modern Languages. 



CLYDE L. LYON, A. B. 
Professor of Reading 



jff 



"The best teacher is he who inspires the listener to an ambition to teach himself." 

PAGE TWENTY-EIGHT 



f^? 9 



tt 



mmm 



5 



IDA S. SIMONSON, B. L. 
Professor of Literature 



JULIA E. GILBERT, Ph. B. 
Assistant in Literature 



EDWARD CARLTON PAGE, A. B. 
Professor of History 



EDITH S. PATTEN, Ph. B. 

Assistant in Psychology 
and History 




"If men could learn from history, what lessons it might teach us. 

PAGE TWENTY-NINE 



I J 



f^? 9 



It 



I^JIlfc4 



dS 




L. EVELINE MERRITT 
Professor of Drawing 



AGNES BROEMEL, B. S. 
Assistant in Drawing 



S. JOSEPHINE STEWART, A. D. E., 
B. S. 

Assistant in Home Economics 



CELINE NEPTUNE, A. B. 

Professor in Domestic Science 



"Art begins when people begin to find joy in their work." 

PAGE THIRTY 



I I 

o 

A 



B: 



J^§«ft=4 



JESSICA FOSTER 

Director of Physical Training 



ROBERT GUY BUZZARD, S. B., 

S. M. 

Professor of Geography 



CELESTIA YOUKER 

Assistant in Physics and 
Chemistry 



jff 



CHARLES FRANK PHIPPS, B. S., 
M. S. 

Professor of Physics and 

Chemistry 




"A song will outlive all sermons in the memory." 

PAGE THIRTY-ONE 



I I 



It 



MilM 



5 




SAMUEL J. VAUGHN, A. B. 

Professor of Manual Training 



MILO OAKLAND 

Assistant in Manual Training 1 



EDWARD F. EDEL 

Professor of Penmanship 



ESTHER L. BRANCH, A. B., Ped. B. 
Head of Williston Hall 



"Books think for us; reading is thinking with another's head." 

PAGE THIRTY-TWO 



3 i *A 9 

«*> -1^11 I kill X <£? 



tt 



ib«JWp4 



5 



A. NEIL ANNAS, B. S. 
Professor of Music 



VERA M. WISWALL, A. B., Mus. B. 
Assistant in Music 



JESSIE R. MANN 

Assistant in Biology 



RALPH E. WAGER, A. M., Ped. B. 
Professor of Biology 




"Every man I meet is my master in some point and that I learn of him." 

PAGE THIRTY-THREE 



I I 



cL 



It 



(NBftJJWMt 



jB 




JOSEPHINE MARIE JANDELL 
Librarian 



EVA ISABEL McMAHON, B. L. S. 
Assistant Librarian 



CHARLES E. MONTGOMERY, B. S. 

M. S. 

Principal of Normal Training 
School 



MARNA PETERSON, Ph. B. 
Eighth Grade Critic Teacher 



"He is an improving man who can side with his critic against himself." 

PAGE THIRTY-FOUR 



i : 

«*, Xmw tow a <£> 



1= 



fe*NMjf=4 



LOUISE BOSWELL 

Seventh Grade Critic Teacher 



MARIAN MYRTLE SHIVLEY, 
A. B. 

Sixth Grade Critic Teacher 



EVA McKEAN 

Fifth Grade Critic Teacher 



ETHEL IRMA SHATTUCK 

Fourth Grade Critic Teacher 



'Nothing more impairs authority than too frequent use of it. 

PAGE THIRTY-FIVE 



5 




I I 



A 9 I 



B= 



MiJ^M 




RAY SUGARS 

Second Grade Critic Teacher 



GOLDA SHERWOOD 

First Grade Critic Teacher 



CARL LITTLEJOHN 

Principal Glidden School 



CARRIE B. EDMONDSON 

Eighth Grade Critic Teacher 



"Criticism has few terrors for the man with a great purpose." 

PAGE THIRTY-SIX 



I I 



O I 



tt= 



? 



MiJfcfi 



ELSIE WENDLING 

Seventh Grade Critic Teacher 



TILLIE C. BAIE 

Sixth Grade Critic Teacher 



BERTHA F. HUNTSMAN 

Fifth Grade Critic Teacher 



MRS. H. U. MEYERS 

Fourth Grade Critic Teacher 



"Children blessings seem, but torments are." 

PAGE THIRTY-SEVEN 



jff 




I 1 

o 
A 9 



ft 



i^ite^ 




MARY FITCH 

Third Grade Critic Teacher 



ANNIE KING, A. B. 

Second Grade Critic Teacher 



LOUISE ADAMS, B. S. 

First Grade Critic Teacher 



MAUDE NICHOLSON 

Supervisor of Music in the 
City Schools 



"Blessed be the hand that prepares a pleasure for the child." 

PAGE THIRTY-EIGHT 



jff 



9 
<5? 



It 



MMfe^ 



s 




MARY C. PARKER 
Secretary to President 

JESSIE M. DEWEY 
Housekeeper of Williston Hall 



OLIVE SWIFT 
Bookkeeper 

EMILY L. THOMPSON 
Clerk of Williston Hall 



'The highest aim and object in life, is striving for the good of all." 

PAGE THIRTY-NINE 



ft 



jfrsfti 



&M$Mf& 



5 




THOMAS S. MURRAY 
Superintendent of Buildings 



FRANK K. BALTHIS 

Superintendent of Grounds 



JAMES CLARK 
Engineer 



"The world belongs to the energetic." 

PAGE FORTY 






5 



Their Way 



I'm sure you've noticed day by day 
That the Faculty have a peculiar way. 

For one wants this, and one wants that, 
And one wants that, and this, 
And one wants neither one of them. 
Oh, isn't school life bliss? 

And she says, "Sit when you recite," 
And he says, "Stand, young man," 
And she says, "Do not talk so much," 
And he says, "Tell all you can." 

I'm sure you've noticed day by day 
That the Faculty have a peculiar way. 

Eva Jane Padley. 



"One doctor is better than two, but three are fatal." 

PAGE FORTY-ONE 




That she can be a friend to every girl 

And make her feel the Hall's her home 
That she can care for thoughtless students, 

And make them feel the joy of work — 
This is her wish. 

Williston Hall is a home for many Normal school girls — happy, wide 
awake girls. Why are they happy? Not alone because their Hall is 
beautiful or their work pleasant, but because someone's heart is strong 
in maintaining the joyous life within the Hall — someone who has not 
forgotten her college days, Miss Branch. Though the Head of Williston 
Hall, Miss Branch, never seems too busy to know her girls. She has time 
to listen to schoolgirl chatter, to laugh at funny stories told about prac- 
tice teaching, to play tiddle-de-winks on the floor, to win a game of rook, 
or to dance to non-jazz music. She has time to cheer the lonesome girls 
and to sympathize with those who are grief stricken. And all the time 
she does not forget the charge that is hers to keep. Her rules are few 
but they command obedience. Marion Davis. 

PAGE FORTY-TWO 




PAGE FORTY-THREE 



I i 



fS? 9 



ft 



MiJ^ 



5 




"The first step toward greatness is honesty.' 

PAGE FORTY-FOUR 



Our Good Time 

On arriving at N. I. S. N. S. in September, 1919, and seeing so many 
strange faces of both Seniors and Faculty, we, timid Juniors, individually 
wondered if we should ever know one another. The Y. W. C. A. came 
to our rescue with a "get acquainted" party or "mixer" in the gymnasium. 
In order to learn the names of our future friends we pinned on us cards 
on which was written our names and home addresses. It was embarrass- 
ing to listen to the questions the Seniors asked us. Are you from 
Kingston? I've never heard of the place? How do you like it here? 
Are you homesick?" 

Then we became a class. There being no boys in the class it was up 
to the girls to be the leaders. Marion Davis, president, Ila Rice, vice 
president, Gladys Keating, secretary and Mildred Coon, treasurer, should- 
ered the responsibilities. 

Then came the Junior party which was for Juniors alone. We had a 
better time when the dignified Seniors were not around. 

Our New Year's party was better yet. Father Time walked solemnly 
into our midst and not feeling at ease disappeared. Then in pranced the 
little New Year. 

The stunts they pulled off at the Junior-Senior party! And the good 
time afterward! The punch bowl whose contents were delicious was a 
popular place. 

When Maytime came and trees and flowers were in blossom, girls gay- 
ly dressed wound the Maypole, while others with ribbons flying danced 
joyfully. 

What a time we had getting ready for the "Kid" party! The stories 
told by Eula Jandell and Mary Hayes were a treat. The red and green 
stick candy tasted so good! 

The custom is that the Juniors must sometime appear on the stage. 
So we presented the play, "Master Pierre Patelin" and "The Man Who 
Married a Dumb Wife." 

For the Junior Prom which was held in the spacious dining and liv- 
ing rooms of Williston Hall we had an abundance of men and music. 

It was fun to be a Junior! 

In November we had a hard time party. As usual the refreshment 
tables where cider and doughnuts were served, were popular. 

Of our Basket Ball men we were proud for they brought us honor. 
Mt. Morris, Wheaton, Joliet and a few more schools have found out of 
what "stuff" Normal is made. 

In the month of February our thoughts turned back to colonial days 
and we had a good time at the Washington party the Faculty gave the 
school. It was loads of fun getting ready but we had a better time in 
the gym. 

As we look over the calendar of our two years here we recall the poem 
Dr. Cook loved so well and say, "We have had a good, good time." 

"The purest pleasures lie within the circle of useful occupation." 

PAGE FORTY-FIVE 



r— 



i^l&^L- 



:ff 




5ENI0R CLR55 5DNG 



WOROS-HILDUR FLOOIN 
fc 



MUSIC -A.N. ANNAS 



a j -^ i j r r jjj I < j - j j i ; r r J J Jl ' r r r 



1. NOR-MAL DEAR, TO OUR HEARTS rou ARE NEARj E'EN TO- DAr THOUGH WE PART, SONGS OF CHEER REND THE 

2. COM-RADES TRUE, JOYS VEVE SHARED SOR-ROWS TOO, 'NEATH HER WALL5, COOL AND FAIR. IN HER HALLS, ONE AND 

3. AND TO YOU, TCW|RS OF OURS ON THE HILL WE'LL &E TRUE, EV Rr HOURANDFUL- FILL. TASK.S OF 

r — ~1 I '. M- _ -a-- — - — I I ~*~ — _ I \^ I "^"' TT~ i^~ 




AIR, EV - ERY-WHERE VOI - Cf 5 CLEAR, FAR AND NEAR, SING YOUR 

ALL, LING'RING YET, HEAR THE CALL'.'NE'ER FOR - GET, BUT COrlE 

JOY, AN£ OF TOIL AS — m> TAUGHT, UtflLE OUR THOUGHTS TURN TO 



PRAISE 
BACK." 
YOU. 



JOY, AND OF TOIL AS — m> TAUGHT, V^HILE OUR THOUGHTS TURN TO YOU 

CHORUS V ^ 5 

i A , b a : k i i h b - s==E=i .. 



J J s J- r w^ 



r r i ^ 



« 



^^ 



^^ 



THI5 OUR SONG, NOW WE BRING, ALL DAY LONG, LET IT RING, TILL THE 
THOL2GiLWE JOURNEY FAR A - WAY, FROM— *©UR DEAR TOWERS OF GRAY STIU *©WR 




"Let me make the songs of a nation, and I care not who makes the laws." 

PAGE FORTY-SIX 



** i 



it 



k^MM! 




It Is Morning 



T is morning! 
It is morning! 
It is morning! 

The waking birds shake from their wings the hush of night. 
The pearly dew turns into diamonds. 
The rising sun 

The crystal air, 

The breath of life 
Exhale the greatness of the world. 
It is morning! 

Hark ! Hark ! 

We hear the call, 
The call of life — the vibrant voice of life. 
Hear how it calls — 
Answer it, students? 

We answer as one; we answer as one. 

Our old work is done. We look towards the sun. 

We are going, Normal — 

Will you not miss us, Normal? 

We will not forget you, Normal. 
And in every year that passes we will save for you one day. 
To come back and to remember of our work and of our play. 
It shall not be one day only that we save to think of you ; 
But in everything we do — in the duties of each day, 
We will turn and be reminded how these pleasant thoughts once 

grew, 
How when we were little younger you with care laid out our 

way. 
So we do not feel in sadness but in rather tender joy, 
That this moment is the parting. 

It is morning! 
It is morning! 
It is morning! 

John Garner. 



"Poetry is thought in blossom." 

PAGE FORTY-SEVEN 



I I 



9 



e= 



Milfe4 



Jff 




HELEN ABERG 

"Sincerity gives wings to power." 
Regular Course 



MARGARET ADAMS 

"Few know her as she really is." 
Regular Course 



HAZEL ANDERSON 

"We know little of thee — but that is 



Regular Course 



ETHEL ATKINSON 

"Write me down a student." 
Regular Course 



GLADYS BARNS 

" 'Tis easier to know how to speak than 
how to keep silent." 
Regular Course 



"Words are good when works follow." 

PAGE FORTY-EIGHT 



1 I 

o 

A 9 



ft 



MMMt 



VIOLA BARTON 

"Peg is fond of dancing." 
Regular Course 



MONA BELL 

"He hath made me neglect my studies, 
lose my time." 
Regular Course 



LUCILLE BOLLBACK 

"A work so majestic and stately." 
Regular Course 



RUTH BOLLMAN 

"Modesty is an excellent virtue in j 
women." 
Regular Course 



GEORGE BOARDMAN 

"He has already become a school- 
master." 
Manual Training 



5 




"Thought and action combined make human progress." 
page forty-nine 



I 1 



s= 



MiiW 



5 




DOROTHY BRISTOW 

"She who has art has everywhere a 
part." 
Home Economics 



SIDNEY BRISTOW 

"He stoops to conquer." 
Manual Training 



ABBIE BROWN 

"He who does the best his circum- 
stances allow acts nobly." 
Regular Course 



RUBY BROWN 

"Beware of desperate steps." 
Regular Course 



GYLA BUTLER 

"To be good is to be happy." 
Regular Course 



"The mind of a child is so plastic that it will admit of any training." 

page fifty 



t I 



~ Lfa a 



ft 



MiJftMt 



5 



WALTER CANNON 

"He spends his leisure hours in draw- 
ing cartoons." 
Manual Training 



ANNETTE CARLSON 

"A maiden never bold." 
Regular Course 



EDITH CARLSON 

"We like to see her smile." 
Regular Course 



ORA CHAMBERS 

"She flies with her own wings." 
Home Economics 



CECILIA CHEWNING 

"Fairy tales she loves to write to while 
the hours of the night." 
Home Economics 




"Our knowledge is as but the rivulet, our ignorance as the sea." 

page fifty-one 



ft 



9 
A. 



WiM=H 



5 




MILDRED COON 

"A true friend is a precious thing." 
Regular Course 



HELEN COREY 

"What she undertook to do, she. did." 
Home Economics 



FRANK DADDS 

"Never so busy but he has time for 
girls." 
Regular Course 



MARION DAVIS 

"She does all things well." 
Home Economics 



GERTRUDE DENNIS 

"Slow in choosing but slower in chang- 
ing." 
Regular Course 



"All advancement is by ideas, not brute force." 

PAGE FIFTY-TWO 



I I 



It 



i^MM 



9 



jS 



DOROTHY DU VAL 

"She who serves well and says nothing, 
makes claim enough." 
Home Economics 



GRETCHEN EWALD 

"Facetious by nature." 
Home Economics 



MAURIE FINNIGAN 

"I am sure, care is an enemy to life." 
Regular Course 



HILDUR FLODIN 

"Give me the making of the songs of 
the people." 
Regular Course 



RUTH FLUCK 

"We need more of her kind." 
Regular Course 




'The secret of success is constancy of purpose. 
page fifty-three 



tt 



I I 

o 
f±? 9 



9 



MiJ^H 



iff 




ROY FOWLER 

"The attraction at Secor's store." 
Manual Training 



JOHN GARNER 

"To understand him, one needs a dic- 
tionary." 
Regular Course 



RUTH GILBERT 

"/ do pretty much as I please." 
Regular Course 



ELVIRA GOHL 

"And still she giggles on." 
Art Course 



IDA GOTTSCHALG 

"She is a T. H. E. booster." 
Regular Course 



"Accept the world as it is, adapt yourself to it, and be happy. 

PAGE FIFTY-FOUR 



I I 



It 



l^iifM 



MARIE GROSS 

"We're glad to have known you." 
Regular Course 



HELEN GUNDRY 

"Her thoughts are elsewhere." 
Regular Course 



AMELIA HANCE 

"Studying does not take all her time." 
Regular Course 



LOTTIE HERMANSON 
"She is jolly." 
Regular Course 



ELLA HERMANN 

"She has a way about her." 
Regular Course 



fi 





"Men's best successes come after their disappointments." 
page fifty-five 



I t 



It 



i*4iyt 



dS 




ELVIRA HJERSTEDT 

"Would I knew a mart where as a com- 
modity good names might be bought." 
Regular Course 



EDITH I. JOHNSON 

"She let's you know she's there." 
Regular Course 



MARGARET JOHNSON 

"Calm, cool, and collected, surely she 
will rise in the world." 
Regular Course 



RUTH JOHNSON 

"They crowned her the May Queen." 
Regular Course 



ROSE JOSLYN 

"She loves to dance, and dance, and 
dance." 
Regular Course 



'The heart has no secret which conduct does not reveal." 
page fifty-six 



I I 

o 



It 



M«Ml 



MILDRED JULIAN 

"Extremely busy, but quiet about it." 
Regular Course 



MARY LAMB 

"A true heart is an admirable thing." 
Regular Course 



IRENE LOGEMAN 

"They chose her early as a teacher." 
Regular Course 



ELLEN LUHTALA 

"The tales of her people have charms 
for all." 
Regular Course 



ROSE LUNDBERG 

"It pays to be conscientious." 
Regular Course 



3 




"Make your mark, but mind what your mark is." 

PAGE FIFTY-SEVEN 



I I 



i^lijfce 



9 



•2 




VERONICA MADDEN 

"Figs she calls figs; spades, spades." 
Regular Course 



WINNIFRED MALLEY 

" 'Tis hard to match her Irish wit." 
Regular Course 



DOROTHY MARCY 

"Variety is the spice of life, 
That gives it all its flavor." 
Regular Course 



MARGARET McADAMS 

"A fine step betrays a set purpose." 
Music Course 



I FLORENCE McCORMICK 

"Her life has been a series of anec- 
dotes with a different hero in each one." 
Regular Course 



"Correction docs much but encouragement everything.' 

PAGE FIFTY-EIGHT 



I I 



It 



Mia^4 



CLAUDE MIDDLETON 

"One must not take his cares to bed- 
wit h him." 
Manual Training 



BEATRICE MILLER 

"She's a quiet girl — at times." 
Regular Course 



GRACE MILLER 

"She is so stately and tall." 
• Regular Course 



RUTH MILLER 

"Genius is a matter of perseverance, 
not inspiration." 
Regular Course 



PEARL MURRY 

"It is best not to be emotional." 
Regular Course 



5 




"There is no hurry, there is also no time to lose." 

PAGE FIFTY-NINE 



a: 



^«aMt= 



Iff 




HELEN OLSTEN 

"Who sings, drives away care. 
Home Economics 



EVA PADLEY 

"Her writings betray her." 
Regular Course 



DOROTHEA PETERS 

"She who is master of herself will soon 
be master of others." 
Regular Course 



GERALDINE PETERSON 

"With a smile for all.' 
Regular Course 



RUTH POLEY 

"/ hate to see a thing done by halves." 
Regular Course 



"Habit with its iron sinews clasps and leads us day by day." 
page sixty 



I I 

o 



MiJ^4 



MILDRED PADDOCK 

"Perseverance brings success." 
Home Economics 



AILEEN RALEIGH 

"Her looks do argue her replete with 
modesty." 
Regular Course 



ILA RICE 

"There is no index to character so sure 
as actions." 
Music Course 



KATHRYN REED 

"No mollusc is our Katie. 
Home Economics 



CARLTON ROOT 

"Little we see of thee." 
Manual Training 



& 




"Every brave man is a man of his word. 

PAGE SIXTY-ONE 






It 



MiJ^I 



:ff 




GLADYS RUST 

"These delights, if thou canst give, 
Mirth, with thee I mean to live." 
Regular Course 



VIVIAN ROTHWELL 

"A cheerful countenance betokens a 
good heart." 
Home Economics 



ADA SHALES 

"Never do today what you can put of 
till tomorrow." 
Home Economics 



DORIS SHERMAN 

"She can pack away your troubles — 
try her." 
Regular Course 



RUSSELL SMITH 

"My wearied look bespeaks the care of 
a business manager." 
Regular Course 



"Quit making promises, make good." 
page sixty-two 



I I 



m 



MilMf 



WILLARD SMITH 

"He who serves is never free." 
Regular Course 



ISABELLA STAUNCHFIELD 

''The race is got by running." 
Regular Course 



GENEVA STAUNTENBERG 

"She'll stick to it till the end." 
Regular Course 



MAUD STRAUSS 
Regular Course 



RUTH SWANSON 

"Just watch her concentrate." 
Regular Course 




"To find fault is easy, to do better is difficult. 
page sixty-three 



1 I 



ft 



WilM! 



iff 




PEARL SYMONS 

"She lives at peace with all mankind." 
Regular Course 



MABEL TAIT 

"How she can talk!" 
Regular Course 



BERNICE TAYLOR 

"She is liked best who is alike to all." 
Regular Course 



NORA TULLY 

"A little English actor is she." 
Regular Course 



HELEN VOGEL 

"Laugh and be glad, sir!" 
Regular Course 



"We seldom confide a secret, it escapes us." 

PAGE SIXTY-FOUR 



I I 

o 



B= 



MilltlMfc 



a 



NINA WHEELER 

'M principal she would be. 
Regular Course 



MAURINE FINNEGAN 

"She smiles the worries away. 
Regular Course 




"Next to excellence is the appreciation of it." 
PAGE sixty-five 



Ms&M 



Iff Ilk aWr'N Jtktf^i H q 



Heigh-ho! For the Senior Class! 

Heigh-ho! for the Senior Class! 
It's a rollicking, frollicking, merry old class. 
How we love each lad, how we love each lass 
That sings, "Heigh-ho for the Senior Class!" 

Heigh-ho, for the Senior girl! 
The wise little, sweet little Senior girl. 
The lads their banner of praise unfurl, 
"Heigh-ho, for the Senior girl!" 

Heigh-ho, for the Senior lad! 
The strong, young, jolly Senior lad. 
Oh where is the lass who is not glad 
To sing, "Heigh-ho, for the Senior lad!" 

Then, Heigh-ho, for the Senior Class! 
The rollicking, frollicking, merry old class 
How we love each lad, how we love each lass 
That sings, "Heigh-ho, for the Senior class!" 

Nora Tully. 




'Success is ninety-eight per cent hard work and perseverance." 

PAGE SIXTY-SIX 



SB 






h 








'Good actions are the steps which lead up to the throne of — Seniors. 

PAGE SIXTY-SEVEN 





PAGE SIXTY-EIGHT 




I I :,\ 



~:;r:v. -::::;:::;■ :r:;;; ggM 





>■■' 





PAGE SIXTY-NINE 






5 



Mr, New Junior 



We find him walking slowly toward the castle on the hill. He hesi- 
tates at the bridal bushes and does not know just where to go. He 
thinks he will go back. He turns about only to see girls coming up both 
avenues toward the school ; so the safest way out is to go to the main 
entrance. He goes in cautiously and of course does not see the sign, 
"Office." So in a minute he faces Wingless Victory. While admiring her, 
three girls approach and he makes a dash east in the hall. He bumps 
squarely into a girl who is emerging from the girls' cloak room. After 
much embarrassment and apologies he starts forward only to see three 
more girls coming out of the Chemistry Laboratory. To avoid these he 
starts upstairs, but girls again! He wheels about and goes west down 
the hall, narrowly escaping girls at the main staircase by the boy's cloak 
room. He goes up the stairs and at the top of the second flight he stops 
and looks into the study hall. More girls! He then intends to retrace 
his steps down stairs but girls are coming up — so he continues his trip 
upstairs. Poor boy — he lands at the doors of the Art Department. 
Feminine voices assure him the room is filled with girls ; but girls are 
still coming up the stairs. He stands there with a brave look on his face, 
asks the girls where the office is and they willingly give him the inform- 
ation — 'cause they are not so bad as you may think. Of course you 
think they are subject to being old maid school teachers. (Just try to 
tell them that!) Later, one of the boys gives him advice, "Never try to 
avoid a group of girls because you will sure bump into a dozen more in 
trying to make good your escape." This fellow today is trying to avoid 
the girls just to meet the dozen more. 

Glen Halloran. 



"Always in haste — always behind." 

PAGE SEVENTY 



tt 



fcttte^ 



Freshmen Trials 

Every senior has his troubles, 

Each junior has some care, 
But the poor forlorn freshmen 

Have much more than their share. 

Physics, geography, grammar, 
Make us study half the night, 

But study, study as we will, 
We're always far from right. 

We're placed in junior classes, 

And act as wise as they. 
But oh! How can those teachers tell 

That we are freshmen, say? 

The juniors, seniors, faculty, 

Are all so dignified, 
That when we laugh at Paul's bow tie 

They look at us and sigh. 

Well, 'twill not be long before 
We'll be bright seniors, too, 

But we'll not scorn the freshmen 
As the present seniors do. 



Irene E. Selgren. 



Praise of Juniors 

'Tis well they praise this glorious class 

For we deserving are, 
Our records during this year 

Have shown each one a star. 
In lessons, none doth take the lead 

For each one perfect is. 



'It is said that modesty is a jewel, but one may wear too much jewelry.' 

PAGE SEVENTY-ONE 




Ulan} May 

Iter tint* with us mas uerg brief, but 
tue are uerg grateful for tlje little glimpse 
ute Ijah. Slyen me appreciated Iyer louelg 
spirit anb tge quiet bignifg of Iyer gentle 
mags, hut now bg Iyer memorg me are 
aroused to a deeper consciousness of tlje 
beautg and strength, ttyat are an unfailing 
possession of tlyose uigo are euer reabg 
to go on. 




PAGE SEVENTY-TWO 



Our Alumni 

If we were bidden to stand before a map of the world and locate our 
alumni and were further commanded, "Tell all you know about each place," 
we might find it a severe test in geography. For the pointer must move 
busily from Minnesota to Florida, from New York and Washington to 
California, on down to the Panama Canal zone, still on below the equator 
to Chile, across to the Philippines and to China, on to France pausing to 
note! a sacred resting place, then home again moving hither and yon until 
we realize that the day has come, foretold by Dr. Cook, "The happy day 
when we shall have back of us a strong body of alumni out in the world 
at work." 

To tell of their work and varied interests, would take more than "A 
thousand and one nights." Many, teaching in crowded cities, find ways of 
making life easier and happier for little folk coming out of hard, untoward 
conditions; many earnestly work the true Americanization process among 
children of the foreign-born; some have broadened in teaching experi- 
ence and are counted leaders in education, whose counsels are sought. 
Some names we see on the pages of magazines, in story, or verse, or nature 
sketch, and some have achieved the writing of books. Others from the 
environment of their own homes in city and in country, concern them- 
selves with furthering the best interests of their communities, finding 
something to do and doing it well; it may be by scientific farming, rais- 
ing fine stock and. seriously studying how to provide richer milk that 
children may be nourished, or it may be carrying the quickening knowl- 
edge of "The Word" to workers isolated in lonely mining camps in our 
western mountains. All, in one fashion or another, ministering to child- 
hood and youth. 

When they "come back" to us from their distant homes, or meet with us 
at some Teachers' Association, they tell us that their thoughts often travel 
back to their school home. Some of them sing us a refrain from a class 
song: 

"0 towers that stand against the sky 
And silent watch the clouds pass by, 
Thy name is known through deed and story. 
We too, we too, would bring thee added glory." 

We would that we might say to them, "This desire you are abundant- 
ly fulfilling." We would that they might know, even a little, of what 
they mean to us, of how we are heartened by their cordial greetings and 
unfailing loyalty. We would tell them, if we could, of our faith and pride 
in their fine ambitions, of our joy in their achievements. We are glad 
they are our own, who dwelt for a time under our roof tree, and who 
now are "out in the world at work." 

Anna Parmelee. 

"We are led on like little children by a way we know not." 

PAGE SEVENTY-THREE 



IE 



ziMlM 



Hark, to Mr. Meadow-lark! 

Hark to Mr. Meadow-Lark! 

He's speaking, sir, to you. 

Hear him rippling from the grasses 

That sparkle with the dew. 

His throat is charged with gladness, 

His free heart knows no fear, 

He has cut all bonds with sadness, 

Living is glorious, life is dear. 

He's no dreaming idle felJow, 

Drinking off the froth of life ; 

He's a husband and a father. 

And he's known a deal of strife; 

Storms have rocked his home's foundation, 

The price of honest bread is toil; 

It seems, sometimes, that all creation, 

Seeks his family to despoil. 

But listen! Is he singing 

Of a weary world's woe? 

No. "Every day has its night. 

And 'twas God who planned it so." 

So hark to Mr. Meadow-Lark! 

He's speaking, sir, to you, 

From the grasses that are sparkling 

With the merry drops of dew. 

Mary E. Fuller 
Class of 1904. 



PAGE SEVENTY-FOUR 



L i4ife4 



jar 



The Way of the School Teacher 

"Ring-ting! I wish I were a School-Marm" 

How often in our senior year, when plans got so far ahead it seemed 
we would never catch up, when Hist, of Ed. recitations were demanded 
almost monotonously from our section of the class, when icosahedrons 
and paragraph outlines danced alternately in our poor bewildered brain, 
did we express the sentiment above. What a delightfully contented time 
we anticipated September would bring us. And did it? It did not! 

The first day was a work day and so has been every day since. We 
had to learn the names of those forty wigglers and it was doubly hard be- 
cause the names did not fit the pupils. There was Bill with freckled nose, 
rampant red hair, and a belligerent attitude toward life in general and 
school in particular. I repeat that his name was Bill, though he went 
down in the records as Edwin. And then Violet — Violet whose chief de- 
light was not in being modestly tucked away in a corner — but who loved 
to mix in the fiercest encounter and usually came out the victor. Why 
do not people postpone naming their children until they show some sign 
of what they are to be? Think of the readjustments that plan would 
save in the poor teacher's mind. 

Think of the reports — reports of the numbers of pupils, reports of their 
ages, reports of their attendance, reports of their scholarship, reports of 
their vacations. They go on forever like Tennyson's "Brook." The only 
one not yet demanded is on the number of children who have cut their 
second teeth — and that is expected daily. Then there are the gum-chew- 
ers, the paper wad marksmen, the runners on the stairs, the singers in 
the halls, the tearers of paper. Ah, yes, one is glad to have a rest from 
detailed plans and criticisms — but oh, for a critic upon whose judgment 
to learn when things become hopelessly muddled. 

However, the inner side of every cloud, you know. There is the joy 
of seeing pupils happy in their work; there is the queer little feeling of 
pleasure to see the contest over the carrying of teacher's parcel — and 
last, but by no means least, the notice of an increase in salary (a very 
small increase, to be sure, but at any rate an increase) . 

Indeed the way of the school teacher is rough and steep and beset with 
thorns. But among the thorns are the roses, and if we look, we will 
surely find them. 

Marie Kehoe, 
Class of 1919. 



PAGE SEVENTY-FIVE 



AIM 



r I l k^fffrW oVtKkV^IL ! cr 



5/05 

0, £*/£, / love thee well, and I have sought to know 
thy secret, yet I stand before thee dumb today as 
any child that has not learned to speak the sim- 
plest phrase. 

I see thee in the fresh young grass that springs so 
gladly from the winter s sod; but thou art like a 
spirit that eludes the grasp while beck'ning on. 

I hear thee pouring from the throat of that brown- 
coated bird in song, and my heart answers with 
its song that is too deep for words or any sound. 

I touch thee reverently in this warm hand that lies 
within my own; I feel thee pulsing through my 
veins and welling up to overflow in my own con- 
sciousness of thee. 

And to my silent lips there rise two words whose 
meaning I but dimly comprehend the while I say 
them o'er and o'er — God — Love — in time and 
space an anchor for my soul. 

J. R. M. 



PAGE SEVENTY-SEVEN 



sf£? ? 



9 



• A ^ami^f! 



Twenty years have hastened by as those of 
us who have been privileged to live within 
these hallowed walls have met the oncoming 
throngs of youth. How precious this wel- 
coming mother has become to us! How we 
shall look with fond eyes from afar as she 
goes on and on and on in her benignant min- 
istry. We are pilgrims of a day but she 
is immortal. We shall fade into shadowy 
shapes to be forgotten but the endless proces- 
sion of smiling faces and joyous singers and 
ardent spirits will come with each new year 
and those dear halls will witness the ever 
recurring story of those, whose torches aflame 
from her high altars, fill the land with light. 

— From the Baccalaureate Address of 
June eighteen, nineteen nineteen 

John Williston Cook 



5 



PAGE SEVENTY-EIGHT 



B= 



Mite=4 



Gamaliel 



Long, long ago in the days of yore there was a teach- 
er whose name was Gamaliel. We know comparatively 
little about this man directly. But one day there came 
to him a pupil small of stature, stoop-shouldered, of 
defective vision, and tradition says he had a hooked 
nose and that his forked beard was of a ruddy hue. 
In after years this pupil delighted partly to account for 
himself by proudly boasting that he had "sat at the 
feet of Gamaliel." So through the pupil we know that 
the teacher was one of might. For, with his training 
under Gamaliel, when once Paul was touched with the 
power of God, he became the mightiest force in Christ- 
endom excepting only the Master himself. 

In these our days a great teacher dwells among us. 
For more than a quarter of a century in one institu- 
tion and for nearly as long in another he has touched 
the lives of faculties and students. His forceful per- 
sonality, his keen intellect, his great soul have made 
their lasting impress upon the lives of many. So when 
the lengthening shadows, after a while, shall have 
turned into the splendor of the sunshine of a new day, 
in the lives of multitudes from the "Old Normal" and 
from the school of the "Old Grey Towers," out in 
schoolrooms throughout this broad land, John Willis- 
ton Cook will go on still living. Little in need of other 
monument is he who has built himself into the lives of 
others. 

Edward Carlton Page. 



PAGE SEVENTY-NINE 



i o o ( * 



Stye curtain arose ano ttje actors buuieo; 
©tje faculty oresseo In robes of tulsoom, 
®tje Seniors xuearlnn masks of learneo men, 
©tje juniors rlotljco In eloums' ano festers' 

suits, 
©If e others reaoy for ttje gay or solemn rotes. 



PAGE EIGHTY 



H^mifcJ- 



Suggestions to High School 
Graduates 

The unrest which prevails in all lines of human activity has seriously 
affected the teaching profession. There are, however, and will always 
continue to be, attractions in this profession. Even the financial attrac- 
tions are growing greater every day because boards of education every- 
where we are realizing that the financial returns will have to be made great- 
er in order that the position of the teacher may keep pace with the earn- 
ings in other forms of activity. 

The service which the teacher renders, has always been of a high order 
because it is through the teacher very largely that the leadership of this 
republic must be secured. The fact that young men twenty years of age, 
graduating from the Normal School with no experience in teaching, are 
able to command $1,500 a year and more, the fact that young women 
graduating from the Normal school with no experience in teaching are 
able to command $1,200 or $1,300 a year, will act as an encouragement to 
all who are graduating from the high schools and may have had some 
intention of entering the teaching profession. There is no line of endeavor 
which may attract high school graduates and give to them a greater satis- 
faction in the performance of a high class service than will the teaching 
profession. When you have graduated from the Normal School you will 
positively and definitely be fitted to do a specific service. 

The actual expenditure of money necessary to graduate from a Normal 
School, after completing a four-year high school course, is a little more 
than half as much as you find necessary for two years of work in a big 
university. The State will certificate you without examination after you 
have done these two years of work in this professional and technical type 
of school. Why not settle the question of the next ten years of service by 
saying, "I have decided to teach and therefore I shall enter the Normal 
School to become definitely and specifically prepared for rendering a ser- 
vice to the State." 

J. Stanley Brown. 



PAGE EIGHTY-THREE 



MSm^ 



w ik gfflrw^BJF^i u g 



We Shall Cherish— 

Memories of gray stones and towers 

And all they shield most dear; 

But best of all the friendly folk 

That gathered daily here. 

These friendships warm and glowing, 

Wrought true through work and play, 

As down the years we're going, 

Bring back thoughts of yesterday, 

Thoughts of friends and shielding towers, 

Of tomorrow's yesterday. 



Gyla May Butler. 



Our Desire 

Oh may our faith be strong enough 

To love all little children. 
Oh may our minds be keen enough 

To give them fruitful wisdom; 
Oh may our hearts be great enough 

To feel each small heart beating 
And may our souls be pure enough 

To show them life's true meaning. 

Eva Jane Padley. 



'Past and to come seem best, present worst." 

PAGE EIGHTY-FOUR 



» I 



"And as you turn the pages 
Live again in yesterdays." 

The class of nineteen-twenty stops, 

And lingers on its way, 
To recall the pleasant happenings, 

That come through yesterdays. 

It recalls the old time friendships 
That grew, and grew, and grew, 

And the faculty that loved us all, 
And helped us push on through. 

Now we've looked on the past with pleasure 

And seek enjoyment again, 
Which we shall find in the day's occupation, 

And honest service to man. 



Grace Miller. 



"Look gladly into the past." 

PAGE EIGHTY-FIVE 




'The big public is dumb and silent; the editors alone have the privilege 
of doing all the talking." 



PAGE EIGHTY-SIX 



A 3*%ll 



It 



JU^WcWJWUr 



5 



Editorial Staff 



Editor-in-Chief Mildred Julian 

Assistant Wallace Parke 

Business Manager Russell Smith 

Assistant Willard McEwen 

Literary Editor Helen Aberg 

Assistant Frances Keeling 

Personal Editor Helen Olsten 

Assistant Frances Keeling 

Joke Editor Doris Sherman 

Assistant Glen Halloran 

Art Editor Dorothy Bristow 

Assistant Edna Helson 



Alumni Editor Ellen Luhtala 

Assistant Ethel Smith 

Exchange Editor Viola Barton 

Assistant Marcella Black 

Men's Athletics Editor. .. .Sidney Bristow 

Assistant DeForest Hunt 

Girls' Athletics Editor. .. .Gretchen Ewald 

Assistant Helen Larson 

Organization Editor Nora Tully 

Assistant Rose Lumberg 

Faculty Adviser Mr. C. F. Phipps 



The Editor's Uneasy Chair 



The common experience of the Normal student includes chairs of three 
kinds. There is the chair that supports his studious moods ; the chair that 
he meets weekly in Gen. Ex., and the chair at the classroom desk, that he 
occupies during those rare moments when the class villain is neither study- 
ing the composition of spitballs nor the most efficient way to ink-shampoo 
his neighbor's curls. 

But the editor's chair — miscalled an easy chair — a fated few of us 
occupy in apparent luxury. Spacious is this chair — indeed! But as no 
way can be discovered for reducing the size you must needs increase your- 
self to the chair's capacity, or rattle about in discomfort. In your rattling 
you strike a sharp corner and find the only remedy to be a bandage of new 
knowledge. You lean back and jump with affright, for a moment's ease 
brings the news, sharp as the tack prick, that your department will have 
one blank, staring page if you dare longer loaf. 

The bright finish of the varnish cracks and dullens as the final day 
brings but half of your material in. A sleepless night of endless work 
follows in the dull, shabby chair. The chair rests on an easy-acting swivel 
that whirls you dizzily when the cold wind of criticism strikes you, and 
rock you gently on the quiet breezes of appreciation. While rocking so 
peacefully you note in alarm, the screw-holes emptied by the loss of re- 
signing co-workers. The arms will scarcely hold in place until the ne~v 
board members come to your aid. But no sooner are the screws firmly in 
place than the upholstery cracks in many places at the illness of other 
workers. No mending can be done until the "Flu" has passed. But in 
the meanwhile, you have discovered that an editor's chair is not padded 
with eider down and velvet, but merely sawdust and artificial leather. 

Mildred Julian. 

"// you have a message for mankind — publish it." 

PAGE EIGHTY-SEVEN 



B= 



9 



MiJtoS 



:S 





When the Upper Case Comes Out 

"Oh, what are all those boys doing in the back of the Audit- 
orium today?" 

"They are all ready to distribute the Upper Case so they take 
their seats back there today. See the stack they have? Thsy 
are magazines that the printing class publishes. They will be 
handed to us as we pass out." 

"That's interesting. How much do they cost?" 

"Oh, that's the beauty of them. They don't cost a cent. The 
boys do all the work and just for practice." 

"The Williston Hall girls think it is fine, for just see what 
they made for their Victrola from it." 

"The Faculty says it is a wonderful piece of amateur work." 

"The Janitors, too. They even forget to lock the library doors 
for reading the jokes." 

"It's Mr. Vaughn's idea. He's great!" 

Let's get our copies. 




'News is the mental diet of the masses." 

PAGE EIGHTY-EIGHT 



A, 



m 






S 




At the Sign of the Blue Triangle 

Comradeship true, sincere, 
Joy buoyant and free, 
Greet every girl who stops here 
At the sign of the Blue Triangle. 

Lessons of work and of play, 
Truths simple yet great, 
Are taught every girl who stays 
At the sign of the Blue Triangle. 

Sympathy kind and sweet, 
Service untiring and willing, 
Are promised every girl who seeks 
For the sign of the Blue Triangle. 



Marion Davis. 




"To serve god without wavering, is the beginning of all wisdom." 

PAGE EIGHTY-NINE 



I J, 



It 



MM^ 



13 




The Brown Room 

When in the rush and the hurry, 
And our work all our time may demand, 
We slip away out of the turmoil 
Into a quieter land. 

We feel in the hour that we spend there 
The force of the peace and good will, 
When at last we go forth to our life work 
These thoughts will remain with us still. 



Abbie Brown. 



'The road to heaven is free to all.' 

PAGE NINETY 



ft 



I 1 



*» I 



mm^. 



■a 




The Candle Light Service 

Over the living room quiet has fallen, 
As girlish figures in white appear. 

Sweet strains of music softly are playing, 
Tis the Candle Light time of the year. 

Slowly they go to the white candle tall, 
To light their small candles too, 

Symbols are these, to stand for the right, 
To keep faith and love ever new. 

Heads bowed low as the vow is said, 
Hearts stirred by the visions fair. 

Eyes are aglow with the dream of Youth, 
To work! To serve and to share. 



Mabel Strouss. 



"As between science and religion, I choose both." 

PAGE NINETY-ONE 







...J 



'If jolly were a pain, there would be groaning in every house." 

PAGE NINETY-TWO 







'Amusements are good that cheer and refresh us." 

PAGE NINETY-THREE 



A 9 * 




The Mollusc 



A Comedy by Hubert Henry Davies, presented in the Normal 
Auditorium, March 2, 1920 

CAST 

Mrs. Baxter Marion Davis 

Miss Roberts, a governess Nora Tully 

Mr. Baxter Frank Dadds 

Tom Kemp, brother to Mrs. Baxter Willard Smith 

"Molluscs — order mollusca — people who spend all their energy and ingenuity in stick- 
ing instead of moving. It is amazing the force a mollusc will use to do nothing, when 
it would be so much easier to do something. There are things about molluscry to make 
you shout with laughter; it's sad enough too." 

This is the theme Mr. Davies works out, developing situations indeed to keep one "shout- 
ing with laughter," yet never approaching buffoonery, meanwhile genially exposing a bit of 
more or less unconscious humbuggery that — sometimes — "will happen in the best of fam- 
ilies." 

Mrs. Baxter — the mollusc — in reality very well, is enjoying poor health rather luxuri- 
ously, using her feebleness to tyrannize most absolutely over husband and governess, exact- 
ing endless waiting on (not that she ever really meant to ask anyone to do anything for 
her — no, no!), herself engaging only in laborious idleness, artfully balking the plans of 
everyone else, and with such sweet regret! Brother Tom breezes in from Colorado. Now 
comes the real play — his irritable, clumsy, masculine efforts to reform his sister; her 
subtle, alert use of passivity and weakness to thwart him. But at last jealousy of the 
governess puts the game in Tom's hand. Thus — Scene, the Baxter home. Present Mrs. 
B., helpless on her couch, and Tom. (Conspicuously absent, Mr. B. and Miss R.) Mrs. 
B. (excitedly) "They may be in the arbor!" Tom — "It's a very good place!" She — "Go 
and look." He — "I won't." She — "Then I will!" And, like the Little Red Hen in 
the First Reader, she did. 

The mollusc is torn from her rock; her game is over! The wind-up comes swiftly; Miss 
R. naively retracts an earlier refusal and accepts a permanent place in Colorado. And the 
Baxters — Well, here is a suggestion: Miss R. to Tom — "You've worked a miracle!" Tom 
to Miss R. (skeptically) — "Were those miracles permanent cures? We're never told! 
We're never told!" And we — well, we wonder! 

Newell D. Gilbert. 
"Let no word escape you unsuitable to the occasion." 

PAGE NINETY-FOUR 



I 



Behind the Scenes 

What a patchwork of a picture those folks made! 

Which was which and who was who? 

To decide 'twas hard to do. 
For each in shade was different as in trade! 

Now in sexes what a mixup we have got. 

There a he who was a she, 

There a she who was a he, 
And each of them was that which he was not! 

A kaleidoscope of colors met the eye, 

One in rose and one in green, 

And the purple are between, 
And every shade in pink and blue of the sky! 

Now I saw a damsel very fair, 

(But her face with paint was greasy, 

Her eyes were strange and freezy,) 
That is, she might be fair, out there in the glare! 

Who are these wonder folk that I have seen? 

Saw you not the curtain rise? 

Heard you not the Ohs and Mys? 
They're the folk from the world behind the scenes! 

Nora Tully. 




"Foster the beautiful." 

PAGE NINETY-FIVE 



I I 



1 



A Xilll kill A <£> 



It 



^JJWf4 



jb 




The Chinese Lantern 

Presented by Senior Class, Normal School Auditorium, 
Tuesday Evening, June 17, 1919 

The Chinese Lantern is a comedy by Lawrence Housman. The action 
takes place in the art studio of Mr. Olangsti. There are three acts. Be- 
tween the second and third acts three years intervene. The time is pre- 
sent. The story presents the fulfillment of the prophecy of The Star 
that the person who marries Mee-Mee shall be a great artist. 

CAST 

Olangsti, an artist Kalherine Smith 

Mrs. Olangsti, his wile Mae Flood 

Yunglangsti, his son Glendora Graves 

Students — 

Hiti-Titi , Ruth Lohafer 

Pee-ah-Bee Eleanor Parson 

Han-Kin Clara Smith 

Tee-Pee Neahlie Lohafer 

Nau-Tee Thora Lindberg 

New-Lyn Martha Hillegus 

Li-Long Fern Lawton 

Josi-Mosi, a rag merchant Helen Robertson 

Cosi-Mosi, his brother Mildred Banker 

Tikipu, a drudge Eulah Jandell 

Mee-Mee, a slave girl Mary Hayes 

Wiowani, an old master Margaret McTague 

A Crier, Bailiffs, Citizens 

"Nearly every success is due to starting right and sticking to it." 

PAGE NINETY-SIX 



El 



A 



MMf^ 



=2 



Santa Claus Shop 



'Twas the night before Christmas 

And in Santa's shop, 
All was hurry and scurry 

And all on the hop. 

The toys were all finished 
With the greatest of care, 

While Santa, dear soul, 
Lay asleep in his chair. 

Soon Santa awoke, 

And said with great glee, 
"Oh, thank you, dear friends, 

All is ready, I see." 



Then out spoke the doll, 

A wee little mite, 
"Please, Santa, let's all 

Have a party tonight." 

So Santa consented 

To a few minutes' spree, 
And in danced the toys 

'Round the big Christmas tree. 

But soon 'twas ended 

With tidings of joy, 
And then they departed 

To a DeKaib girl or boy. 

Viola Barton. 



A Doll's House 

"I am very glad to introduce Miss Hortense Nielson, who will read for 
you, "A Doll's House," by Henrik Ibsen, and the room grew quiet with 
expectance. And what an evening that was! It was as if a play were 
being given on the stage. Fascinated we watched her as she now took 
the part of the gay, light-hearted Nora, now of stern, unfeeling Krogstad, 
and again of another character, each one differing in every way from any 
other one. When Nora's children rushed in to their mother, one could al- 
most see them. The audience anxiously followed Nora, and when she 
realized she was living in a doll's house, and being played with like a 
doll by Helmer, everyone was glad for her and yet — what an emptiness 
there was for Helmer, as he sat there and saw his wife pass out of her 
home — his home. The only remaining hope was that the "miracle of 
miracles" might happen and Nora come back, not as Helmer's "little 
squirrel or lark," but as his true wife. It was all very quiet. The audi- 
ence saw Nora, Helmer, and all the rest slowly fade away and leave Miss 
Nielson standing there — alone. 

Ruth King. 



"To believe in yourself, fills you with power to do things.' 

PAGE NINETY-SEVEN 



«= 



WSJWp4 



:9 




<j$£j£;£&C- 



The Rivals 



On the evening of February fifth, under the auspices of the Men's Ath- 
letics Department, the Coffer-Miller Company presented in the school au- 
ditorum, the three act comedy, "The Rivals," by Richard Brinsley Sheri- 
dan. Mr. Lyon read choice bits from the play, and told of the historical 
significance of this comedy among dramas at the general exercise period 
preceding the performance. The student body and faculty thus felt as 
though they were meeting old friends when Mrs. Malaprop, Bob Acres, 
Lydia Languish and Sir Lucius O'Trigger made their bows. 

The action took place before a plain curtain. Changes from one char- 
acter to another were lightning like, and were done so admirably that the 
audience broke into spontaneous applause many times during the perform- 
ance. Those who have seen various comedies played in DeKalb of late 
years, did not hesitate to brand "The Rivals" as the best attraction the 
Normal School has ever sponsored. Next season the Coffer-Miller Com- 
pany present Shakespeare's comedy, "The Taming of the Shrew," and plans 
are already being made to have them with us again. 



'Opportunities — every life is full of them." 

PAGE NINETY-EIGHT 



tt L ^iUr 



iff 



Miss Finch'es Mammy Stories 

Well, chillern, I'se gwine ter tell y' 'bout Mis Finch'es Mammy Stories. 
Mis Finch she dun come ter our school an' talked, she did; an' Ise gwine 
ter tell y' de reason why fer because. 

Way back in Virginny, Mis Finch she had a monstrous big ole black 
mammy whose pa was some fureign potentate and her ma was a African 
princess an' both of 'em wuz extremely high born an' mighty sclusive like. 
Course dat made her a princess, too. An', oh my chile, de stories dis ole 
black mammy could tell. 'Bout de creation of de world an' how de Lord 
jis got tired an' disgusted a havin' de water an' de dry land all squzz up 
together an' so he jis takes things in his own han's an' squatulates 'em 
apart an' puts de dry land on one side and de water on tother an' says, 
says he, "Now, you-all separate yerselves an' go long 'bout your own busi- 
ness," says he. An' dey did. 

Nex she told 'bout Adam an' Eve mussin' roun in de garden of Edem. 
An' how dat ole speckle black sarpent come a shufflin' an' a snookin' an' 
a whisperin' aroun' tryin' ter hear what Adam an' Eve wuz a talkin' 
about an' how Eve she jis drop right over like she had stiff religion when 
she seed de ole sarpent. An' ever since dat time, when people comes a 
snookin' an' a peepin' roun, folks says, "Dems Eve droppers." But Eve 
she dun took de apple an' bite herself a mouthful of it an' tell Adam how 
larapin it taste til Adam, masculine like, dun et de whole apple, core an' all. 
An' den dis ole black mammy she tole 'bout Moses in de bull rushes an' 
how ole Pharoah's daughter dat didn't have no honest ter goodness chil- 
lern of her own, come a sloshin' roun gettin' her personal all mussed up a 
huntin' fer de little baby Moses floatin' roun in a bull rush, an' how she 
jis had ter step careful like ter keep from trompin' on de little 'Gyptians 
iayin' roun thick as flies. But she wuzn't huntin' no 'Gyptians; she wuz 
huntin' little Moses. 

Law, chile, dat boy Moses, what a figger he must a cut in his courtin' 
days, wid his horns a perjaculatin furward majestic like an' his silk hat 
on de back of his haid ! De Lord must a puzzled hisself a right smart to 
figger out a chariot fittin' an' sniptious enough to carry dis hif alutin Moses. 

An' how she could sing! An' de songs she 
could sing ! Some sorter low and mournful like 
an' tothers quick and devilish. An' de way she 
could roll dem lustrous eyes an' quiver dat 
lonesome voice an' rock back'ards an' fur'ards 
dat spressive personal of hern an' jis kinder 
lather it all over wid sweet an' mournful tunes. 
Bless me, ah certainly wish Miss Finch would 
come agin ! S. J. V. 

"// you would not be forgotten, do something worth writing." 

PAGE NINETY-NINE 





'Music causes 



us to 



think eloquently." 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED 



r v-". 




if f* if i 





I| ft f* 



«i a 



Jisv* 



"Music is the speech of angels." 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED ONE 



f£? 9 



ft 



Mito^ 



5 



w?w^ 




Treble Clef 



We go thru life 

singing on our way. 
Let care and trouble 

conquer whom they may. 

Our part as members of the Clef 

is this 
To be happy in the spirit of 

the N. I. S. N. S. 

On Monday eve' 

neath Normal's towers grey, 
You'll see a light, 

hear some gay melody. 

We dance, sing, work, 

with right good will; 
To make worth while 

each day on Normal Hill. 

Burdell L. Whitford. 

The Valentine Party 

Hearts, hearts, everywhere! What can be the reason? Oh, yes! It 
is St. Valentine's day, and the night of the Treble Clef party. The kind, 
old Saint must have been exceedingly generous with his hearts for the 
long living room was festooned with them in every conceivable manner. 
There were other hearts too, so frilled and fancifully dressed in filmy, 
silken draperies that one would not recognize them, and still others — 
gallant hearts — in stranger garb; hearts of a very different kind, that 
lightly beat in response to the swing and sway of the gay music. But 
from where did the music float? Listen! Yes, from beyond that bank 
of ferns ! Dainty cupids rivalled the hearts in decoration, and who knows 
but what some were busy fluttering about various other happy hearts. 
The orchestra was playing, and all were dancing, only pausing a few 
moments to sip the refreshing frappe. When the dancing stopped and 
the last strains of Home, Sweet Home had died away, all were glad they 
were Treble Clefers. 

M. McA. 
"The worst that can be said of dancing is that it is a harmless folly." 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWO 



«t 



ys£fc4 



Monday Night 



Oh, Peg!— Yes!— Ready to go to Treble Clef?— I don't think I'll go. 
Had your cut ? — No, I've too much work. — Oh ! come on, Mr. Annas won't 
like it if you don't show up. — Well, where's my sweater? — We've only a 
couple of minutes. — Say, but that wind's cold — B-r-r-r — let me in quick — 
Now for the stair. — First flight. — Second flight. — Third flight. — Ah-ha-ah- 
ha. — The - last - one. — Oh, for an elevator. — There's the chord — Hurry — 
Here — Present — Any business — A party — Great! — Fine! — appoint a com- 
mittee — Pass the music — What is it — Rap-rap-rap — Ready — all eyes this 
way. — Sing! — "Like pearls in the depths of the ocean," — Are you going 
to the lecture — S-h-h ! — I've lost my place. — A little stronger, altos ! — A lit- 
tle more expression — that's it. — Look up as often as you can — That's all 
for that. — "A-lone in yon, cold north" — I feel it! — She stands there and 
shiv - vers. — Make it sound as if she were. — Who shivers — A pine tree, of 
course! — Altos, you are sharp. — Oh, he doesn't know them! — There you 
are — sharp? — why you sung that rest. — That's all for that — Now — ready 
— sing — without your music — D-e-e-p — R-i-v-e-r — A little more shading — 
"Oh, don't you want to go" — Yes, it's about time — "to that promised land." 
No use wanting in your case — Pass the music in — That's all for tonight 
— Our medley! — Yes! 

Treble Clef, Treble Clef, 

Jolly girls are we, 
Singing all our cares away 

Our hearts are light and free. 
Now when the Clef begins to sing, 
i On every Monday night, 

Some people put their windows down 

And shut their doors up tight. 
But others when they hear our song 

Their hearts with pleasure thrill; 
They give three cheers to the Treble Clef 
And the girls on Normal Hill! 




Margaret McAdams. 



"Long after it was heard no more, the music in my heart I bore." 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED THREE 



s= 



I I 

i o o j < 



3T 






.if 






Orchestra 



A burst of music upon the air, 

A violin flat, 'tis over there! 

Where's the drummer? He's out of time! 

But, Oh, cornet, you've the wrong line! 

Such is a practice on Wednesday night, 

When they're trying to blend the harmony right. 

In General Ex. their programs delight, 
For our dance they play with all their might. 
They give heart to the cast, of our Normal plays, 
And lighten our hearts on Commencement days. 

Margaret McAdams. 



"The orchestra hurls me wider than Uranus flies." 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED FOUR 



9 



fi: 



Msm^ 



We Wonder 

Where are you going Faculty dear? 

Where are you going tonight? 
No matter what teacher you wish to waylay — 

Tis out of the question tonight. 

To Faculty Club they are going tonight. 

'Tis held in Miss Whitman's room 
They're eager to be there — each one has a smile, 

'Tis club night for teachers tonight. 

Oh, what do they do at this meeting tonight? 

Oh, what do they say in there? 
Is it we- who have caused such a meeting to be? 

Or of frolicking do they partake? 

Oh, I cannot tell you what happens in there — 
'Tis rumored they feast and they play. 

And have often times a lecture or two — 
For more — ask Miss Parmelee. 



'Happiness is everywhere." 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIVE 



9 



B= 



&M$tir4 



3 




H. A. C. Club 

The H. A. C. girls have the very best times, 
Just learning to be expert cooks; 

Attending the meetings, once every month, 
To eat, and to sing without mention of books. 

The Juniors are bright and learn all about, 
The microbes that fly in the air; 

The best way to serve asparagus soup, 
And styles they never should wear. 

As Seniors they learn how to calculate, 
The calories each one should eat; 

And lunches they serve at the lowest rate; 
The H. C. of L. they defeat. 



Helen Corey. 




'Eat good food, it is the best investment possible." 
PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIX 



= J g 4Mft=4 



Hats! Hats! Hats! 

Do you happen to possess a pert pot-hook of a nose, combined with other 
unlovely features? Or did the Good Looks Fairy endow you with all 
the gifts essential to external attractiveness? Whether her gifts were 
good or bad there is a way to enhance the one and minimize the other, 
once you have learned a secret. 

Perhaps you had not even guessed there was a secret until one day there 
bloomed in the foyer such an extraordinary garden. Queer brown stems 
growing right out of long tables, and blooming atop each stem a gorgeous 
blossom of a hat, all wrought by the magic of the millinery girls. 

And such a variety of blossoms ! Hats turned up and hats turned down ; 
floppy hats, scoopy hats, sedate hats and saucy hats, meek hats and mili- 
tant hats, going-to-church hats, going-to-somewhere-else hats, with no two 
just alike. It was evident from the diversity of styles that the Good Looks 
Fairy had bestowed just as many varieties of noses, for that is part of the 
secret. Your hat must be made to exactly suit your particular combin- 
ation of nose and eyes and all the rest of you. A large, lady-like black 
satin hat belongs only to a tall lady who deports herself with dignity, while 
a little round, saucy, brown hat, boasting a smart red ornament, must 
only adorn a little round, red-cheeked, brown-haired girl. Whereat it ap- 
pears that the wrong hat may not only do frightful damage to one's ap- 
pearance, but may proclaim a most serious-minded person to be a frivolous 
little goose. 

And the rest of the secret? If the hat is to be just right for you, you 
must know how to make it yourself. Consider the reward of such knowl- 
edge. A yard of silk, a bit of wire, a bit of straw, and presto ! a coveted 
thirty dollar hat may be reproduced at any time for $3.50. Indeed, one 
may have two hats where she could formerly only afford to purchase one. 
Not vanity this, but thrift. 

So this is the secret and the philosophy of hat-making: that one must 
be what her hat says she is, but she must be very careful of what she 
makes her hat say about her. 

Celestia Youker. 



'The secret of happiness is never to let your energies stagnate." 

PAGE (INK HUNDRED SEVEN 



I J, ; 



tz 



JWKftALMt 



iff 




Living Up to T. H. E. 



The members of the T. H. E. need strong will power to resist all the 
temptations set before them. It is not easy to say, "No, thank you," 
when a plate of creamy fudge, which would melt in your mouth, or some 
fluffy white pop corn is offered to you. Eight glasses of liquid look like 
an enormous amount to drink every day, but gulp it down! It will soon 
become a habit. 

The rules are always before us saying, "Don't" or "Do" but we treasure 
the emblems we have earned by obeying them, and cherish memories of 
hikes and picnics. 

Bertha M. Holbrook. 



"The routine of right habits insures promptness and regularity of action.' 
PAGE ONE HUNDRED EIGHT 



Confreres Club 

Feeling the need for an organization among the men of the school, late 
in the winter quarter, discussion of the situation led to the forming of a 
club among the senior men. Since this organization was iormed to fur- 
ther social conditions among the men, a name was chosen which embodied 
this consideration, and the club is called Confreres. 

Membership is of two types, active and associate. Men students when 
elected become active members, and the faculty men may be chosen as 
associates. Due to the fact that organization was necessary, the senior 
men were given privilege of being charter members, and the following 
men have the honor of being the lounders of what is hoped will be per- 
petuated by future generations of men students: Sidney Bristow, wix 
Garner, Claude Middleton, Frank Dadds, John Garner, Willard Smith, 
Russell Smith, Glenn Hallaron and Carleton Root. 

All men now in school during the winter term of 1920 were declared 
automatically elected to membership, and that privilege was extended by 
public notice. These men will be initiated according to a set ritual which 
embodies the principles of the organization — those of a social nature. 
The plan for membership is such that the organization will be carried 
over from year to year by the senior men, the junior men being elected 
at the beginning of each new school year. The basis for membership is 
an actual participation or marked inclination to participate in student 
activities. 

The activities of the Confreres will cover a wide field. Already they are 
propagating plans for many beneficial changes and social events. Such 
organizations are now doing much for the men in some of the other normal 
schools, and Northern Normal wants to be equally progressive. 

Robert Guy Buzzard. 

Without Our Clubs 

Can you imagine what life here would be like if it weren't for the T. H. E., 
the Y. W. C, A., the girls' and the boys' basket ball teams, the Treble Clef, 
the Dramatic Club, the Helen Club, the Ruth Club and what not? 

Organizations create "pep", make the school alive. They help give var- 
iety to General Ex. Do you remember how cleverly the T. H. E. worked 
out their slogan for us, how the girls basket ball team announced their 
game with Aurora? The faculty smile and seem to be glad when they 
know there is to be an organization stunt. Of course, they know they 
are going to see something good and all for nothing. What would Friday 
and Saturday nights be like without a basket ball game, a Junior or Senior 
party, or one like our Washington party, or other social affairs planned by 
the different organizations? Wouldn't we all be applying for a job as 
matron in some Old Ladies' Home, or a cook in some Orphan Asylum ? 

Ruth Fluck. 

"Start off the day with a laugh and you needn't worry about the rest of the day." 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINE 



ft 



' 1 ° ' o 



s 




The Helen Club 

I thought I'd like to join a club, 
Which would relax my brain; 

A club which gave a lot of spreads, 
And liked to entertain. 

I decided on "The Helen Club," 
The name sounds very cozy. 

So I set off to join it 

With outlook clear and rosy. 

When I arrived they asked my name, 

I told them, "Madeline," 
And when they asked by middle name 

I said, "It's Eveline." 

They said, "You will not do at all 
'Cause Helen's not your name, 

That is one requirement — 
Our one and only aim." 

So just to spite 'em, guess I'll form 

A "Madeline Club" only, 
As I'm the only one in school 

It will be rather lonely. 



Geraldine Peterson. 



"Most of the born leaders of men are women." 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED TEN 



9 

«5? 



B= 



M»M 



^ 




The Ruth Club 

See that girl go tearing down the hall, 

She has so many goodies; what if she should fall! 

Where is she going this early Wednesday eve? 

To the Ruth Club meeting, I surely do believe. 

She stops at her own room, and sets the goodies down, 

And soon eight other Ruths come trooping in, without a frown. 

As soon as all are present, one Ruth calls the meeting, 

Another Ruth takes the money that will be spent in eating. 

The other Ruths are helping, and lending a hand, 

And all the Ruths are laughing and chatting as fast as they can. 

Ruth Johnson. 



Our Helens 

Helen Corey is our cook, 
Helen Shaffer, our music book, 
Helen Thomsen, the one that's tall, 
Helen Corbin, shortest of us all. 
Helen Vogel hasn't grown far, 
Helen Larson, our basket ball star. 
Helen Ingraham from us went, 
Helen Heath was then president 
Helen Beebe is our secretary, 
Helen Blackman's notices never vary. 
Helen Hunt can also cook, 
Helen Gundry has another outlook. 



"Did you ever feel how it stings to be slighted?' 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED ELEVEN 



Helen Heath. 



UMkf f ' — 

Pay Night at the Rickard Club 

Sing a song of "pay night," 

Students in a row. 
Parke with his little book, 

Makes your change look low. 

"Hurry now, step quickly, 

Get your receipt and go, 
Girls! I've no time for fooling. 

Come, pay me what you owe." 

"Now there! Supper's ready, 

Late we'll surely be. 
What have we? Cake or cookies?" 

"Pay your board and see." 

Thelma Olson. 

Rickard Club Days 

Does the studying and the strife 
Of Normal school life, 

Really make you tired after all? 
You'll be wishing some day 
You could just run away, 

And answer the Rickard Club call. 
You'll find joy and peace, 
Where cares always cease, 

Back there beneath the old club roof. 

Let the "Dorm" student praise 
Her Williston Hall days, 

While the real things wait, 
Away on the edge 
Of the Normal School ledge, 

For the joys of the Rickardite. 
You'll find joy and peace, 
Where cares always cease, 

Back there beneath the old club roof. 

Amelia Hance. 




"To keep your own secret is wisdom, to expect others to do so is folly. 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWELVE 



It 



M#!&^ 



IS 



A Righte Excellente Recipe 
Well Tested & Proved; for 
a Merrie Malsyne for y c 
Twentie Seconde Daye of Y e 
Seconde Monthe. 

A goodlie companie of y e ladyes and y e gentlemen, with their righte 
semely Wyves, myxed welle together in that weste room, whence come 
ofte tymes y e savorie odors & y e whyte garmented maydes. Y e candles, 
bye their warm & kindlie glowe, dystyngyshying not too clearly y e Spin- 
sterre Facultie from y e favoured Facultie Wyfe. An plentie-fulle Sprynk- 
elynge of gaye talke & revelrye. Delectable vyctualles, y e fragrante 
dyshes of tea — y e toothsome facymyles of y e hatchette, whereby y e vera- 
cyous father of his Countree did fell y e cherrie tree — y e cherryes thate 
grewe on thate Tree. Y e whole, savoured & garnished bye y e comely 
maydes & their moste gracyous Mistresse. So pleasurefulle to y e eye and 
spyrite be they, I adde in y e gaye flowered gownes & decent kerchief ; with 
flypantte curls & merrie eyes & withalle so mindful of their prettyest cour- 
tesyes, y e faire Priscilla and y e greate Dame, y e Mistress Washington 
could well them envie. Should y e maydes wishe againe to compounde y e 
selfe-same myxture, here sette forthe, y e geste give full solemne word 
they be notte wrothe nor loathe. 




h«wi7 




"Fortune, or misfortune, is either good or poor management." 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTEEN 



B: 



I I 



f^? 9 



MfttM 





PAGE ONE HUNDRED FOURTEEN 



«- M ife 4 



The Washington Party 

Listen, my children, and you shall hear, 

Of the Washington party, the best of the year. 

A wondrous company assembled at eight, 

To list to a program of earlier date. 

The men with white wigs greeting gay ladies fair. 

Hoop skirts were the fashion, puffed skirts, powdered hair. 

The hours flew merrily, and so did our feet, 

And for such a gay time we always shall meet. 

Edith Boyd. 



'You must be in fashion, is the utterance." 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTEEN 



Sy 



s^? 9 



It 



l&m 



BMr4L 



:S 




At Home in the Library 

"Oh, what's the use of reading this stuff?" I look up to see several 
yawns and immediately forsake "the political parties" myself. The maga- 
zine table looks tempting but it is occupied. Nearby, a young man with 
his head on his hand, trying to fathom a "math" problem, is disturbed 
by noisy Juniors whose minds are wandering from the faculties' favorites 
which they have taken from the reserve shelves. In the other corner one 
of the librarians is patiently reserving books for the three-thirty rush. 

Traffic begins down the grand promenade. The Faculty come one at a 
time, the Seniors in twos, and the Juniors by the bunch. A little lady 
comes in the east door with her hands full of papers; looks wearily from 
side to side and soon goes back followed by a theme writer. An excited 
Senior comes in from interviewing a "supt." and starts a coffee-house dis- 
cussion at our table. The bell jingles loudly and after a pause there is a 
shuffle and chatter from the uttermost parts of the building. They march, 
saunter, and straggle through the grand promenade, half of them forget- 
ting to put on their silencers. The politicians, athletes, and society folk be- 
siege the newspaper table. The last ones hurry off to their classes and 
quiet reigns again. 

Gyla M. Butler. 



"The easiest way for getting a reputation of being deep, is to keep still." 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTEEN 



I 



9 



It 



«»ms 



fS 



In Long Ago 



Would you visit a land of fancy, 

Of visions of long ago, 
Relics and wealth of many climes, 

Treasure and art and curio? 
Then come to the Page Museum 
And, as you wander through, 
You'll see strange sights and wonder 

If it really can be true, 
That the Chinese women wore those shoes 

On their tiny crippled feet; 
Or if grandfather used that wooden yoke, 
Driving oxen through the street; 

Or maybe a Mexican bandit 

Once wore that high crowned hat. 
Oh, see this lace from the Philippines, 

How can they make it like that? 
Over here in the colonial room 

Are things from the long ago, 
A stately old four-poster 

With its patchwork quilt, just so; 
A tiny yellow cricket, 

Arid a wooden cradle, low. 
At one side, near the window 

A drop leaf table stands, 
Bringing visions of family dinners 
And happy holiday plans. 
An ancient iron caldron, 

A spinning wheel of old ; 
Splint bottomed chairs to sit on, 
A mirror with frame of gold. 
A grandfather's clock in the corner 
Which no longer ticks the hours, 
Its solemn, ancient face 

Bedecked with a spray of flowers ; 
A hair covered trunk, scarred and tattered 

From travel for many a day, 
Perhaps in a prairie schooner 

O'er a long and dangerous way. 
These, amid countless others, 

Are some of the things you'll see, 
When you visit the Page Museum 

The Museum of History. Pearl Murray. 




'History is the register of lessons which time has written for us.' 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVENTEEN 



«L 



A •> 



ft 



MSJMrJl 



S 




The Friendly Living Room 



Such good times as we have had in the large friendly living room at 
Williston Hall. Its soft, tinted walls, its lazy chairs and big davenports, 
all invite us to little groups and soon we are telling everything; how mis- 
chievous the boys and girls were this morning; how Johnnie fell out of 
the swing and hurt his knee ; how we disgraced ourselves before our 
critic — and a Supt. too. Or perhaps we forget our school work and ex- 
press our opinion of the date that Flo had last night; the new man at 
Normal, the millinery array, or the party we didn't have — "for religious 
reasons." The magazine table displays enticing stories which drive dull 
care away. The Brunswick and the open piano, with its load of music, 
send out alluring appeals and we're ready to answer. So fly the minutes 
until that warning study bell doth ring — too soon, too soon! Many are 
the parties we owe you, friendly living room; the formal dances when the 
living room is changed to some new fairy place and girls in soft, fluffy 
dresses — oh, never before have they looked so pretty — move in and out. 

Ruth S. Miller. 

"East or west, home is best." 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED EIGHTEEN 



A^liiU i __g 



The Penny Drill 

Springfield said we didn't need a Victrola to complete our education. 
Such an unwise suggestion could not be accepted by the Williston Hall 
girls and they decided that their shoulders, already almost bent double by 
their school duties, must shoulder one more burden. Not many of them, 
however, made donations of a hundred dollars or so. Therefore, some 
plan for the accumulation of money was necessary. So every Thursday 
night the girls took from their bulging pocketbooks, all the coppers in sight. 
In the absence of coppers, they were not ejected from the dormitory if they 
rose to the occasion of a nickel. The girls, Miss Branch leading, then 
formed in line out in the hall and as they passed into the dining room 
dropped their donations into a jar on the table in the middle of the room. 
The fund grew — not rapidly, but steadily and hopefully, the girls have 
volunteered to keep up the good work even after the Brunswick (for that 
is what we purchased) is paid for, in order that there may be a fresh sup- 
ply of Dardanella records on hand. 

C. Chewning. 



Rhythmically Speaking 

The supper bell rang at five thirty and for fifteen or twenty minutes the 
dining room was filled with a cheerful hum of voices. At six the scene 
had changed completely. It was as if a fairy had waved her wand over 
the place. The tables were stacked and the floor was waxed. An interim 
of two hours and there was a sudden burst of music and gaiety ; seemingly 
causing the very atmosphere to throb to the time of the music as happy 
dancers glided across the floor. So every heart, light and carefree, lost 
itself to intermingle with the rest, and all were one. But the fairy waved 
her wand all too soon ; the music stopped ; the scene was a dining room 
once more. 

Many times has the fairy waved her wand over the place and given us 
pleasure. She forgets no one for there are games and card tables for 
those who do not care to dance. We shall never forget these informal 
parties at Williston Hall, they will be happy memories with us as we go 
out into the world. 

Gretchen Ewald. 



"We are happy in this hall." 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINETEEN 



9 



t v ^m^\ 



For the Teams 

Come on you Normal Team, 
Our chance for loss is slight, 

Come on you Normal Team, 

With all your strength and might. 
Come on you Normal Team 
We know you'll win the fight. 

There'll be a hot time at Normal tonight. 

Come on you team, team, team, 

It's up to you to win. 
Come on you team, team, team, 

We never will give in, 
For when you throw that ball 

They'll have no score at all. 
There'll be a hot time at Normal tonight. 



Geraldine Peterson. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWENTY 



I I 



MffiJMM 



E U g=fflFH JMflr=3 U S 




In athletics, as in everything else, the great war compelled tremendous 
modifications. For the most part it brought about either a greatly limit- 
ed amount or complete cessation. Interest was centered in a contest of all 
absorbing dimensions elsewhere played. 

Thus it came about that when the officials pronounced the big game 
ended, the deeply-rooted interest in native sports blossomed forth afresh, 
and, if anything, with a vigor greater than ever before. And, so, when 
Normal opened in the fall of '19, and some thirty young men, mostly from 
overseas, had come daily to hang their hats in the cloakroom, it was evi- 
dent that something nad to be done. It was too late for football ; basket- 
ball was the one immediately available sport, and consequently affairs 
were so regulated as to begin practice about November first. 

Experienced men were interested : Cannon, Garner, Winterhalter, Mid- 
dleton, Bristow, Albertson, King, in fact all the squad, had played in High 
School or in Normal. The problem was only to find the right combination 
of men, learn the plays and get conditioned physically. 

It was thought, too, that Normal ought to enter a larger field of ath- 
letics. Consequently games were arranged with Old Normal and Eureka 
College, as well as with old time rivals. In addition new opponents nearer 
home were added to the schedule. An unusually long season was the re- 
sult. The first game was played with Lewis Institute on November 
twenty-second, and the last with the American Legion on April second. 
Unfortunately the coal strike compelled the abandonment of the trip into 
foreign lands to meet Old Normal and Eureka, and, as a result, no return 
games with them were possible. In spite of that fact, however, the 
schedule as it stands is by far the best Normal has ever had. 

And as a step toward the realization of that desirable position which 
Normal must some day hold, the past season must be reckoned the longest 
ever taken. To look backward, however, is not the habit of youth. The 
institution must be youthful ; she must look forward. And in the records 
of the year both behind and ahead, that of '19-'20 shall stand as one de- 
serving remark and respect. But "On, Normal, On !" 

R. E. W. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-ONE 



tc 



MilLfe^ 



Deliberation, calculation, speculation 

The air is filled with din, 
Hesitation, expectation, animation, 

And the ball is inside the rim. 

Aggravation, consternation, jollification, 
As usual we think we'll win, 

Affirmation, alleviation, realization, 

Three cheers for our boys in the gym. 



Cecilia Chewning. 



School Spirit 



The whistle has blown, a rush and a tumble and the game has started. 
The cheering, "Come on, Normal!" "Go to it, Normal!" "That's a fine 
play, right in the basket. Now! Fine! Rah! Rah! for Normal!" And 
a score is made. Back to the center for another send off amid the cheers 
of, "Go Normal, go," "you are going to win," the ball sped towards Nor- 
mal's goal. "Come Winterhalter, put her in, that's the boy, we knew you 
would do it! Rah! Rah! Come, Normal, raise the score." The first 
quarter is over, Normal is in the lead. "Come, let's give a cheer for our 
boys," says our cheer leader. "What's the matter with the team? 
They're all right ! Who's all right? The team." Of course we're all right 
ready to push into the next quarter. Garner leads off with two baskets. 
Winterhalter follows it with another. Time passes. "Rah ! Rah !" For 
Normal is leading at the end of the first half. Some one starts sing- 
ing, "Like a castle on the hill." Instantly everyone is on his feet and 
how the gym re-echoes with the voices. It is time to start over. "Get 
into it Normal. Come Normal beat them, we know you can and will." 
That's fine, two more added to our score. "Bang!" What's the matter 
with Cannon, did he get knocked out? Oh, no, he is going to play again. 
Come, give nine Rahs for Cannon. Oh, there King made a foul, it didn't 
hurt his feelings either, see him smile. He aways smiles during a game. 
Garner put it in the basket. Oh, time is almost up. I hope we make 
another basket. Ah, I knew we would. That was a long shot. Time is 
up. Did we win? I should say we did. 

Isabella Stanchfield. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-TWO 



4Usiiyii 



Basket Ball Boys' Banquet 

Act I. — The curtain rises. 

About thirty festively dressed young ladies and gentlemen gathered 
in the hall outside the Domestic Science dining room on the eve of March 
eighteenth. The occasion was a banquet in honor of the Normal Basket 
Ball Team — the team that has done such splendid work during the past 
season. Before entering the dining room the boys and their partners were 
all introduced to the guests of honor, Dr. and Mrs. Brown and Mr. and Mrs. 
Wager. 

Act II. — The feast begins. 

The room was lighted by the soft glow from green candles placed on 
three long tables. By means of placards, each guest found his place at one 
of the tables and upon all being seated the dinner was served. The dinner 
consisted of four courses, prepared and served by the Domestic Science 
girls, under the supervision of Miss Neptune, and was a triumph in culinary 
art. 

At the conclusion of the dinner, Mr. Wager, who coached the boys, gave 
a talk, speaking of the boys and their work, and then introduced Dr. 
Brown. Very eagerly the young men responded when each one was called 
upon to express his own sentiments. In one way their talks were all sim- 
ilar — they were rather conspicuous by their lack of length. Mr. Annas was 
among the guests, and between the talks he played and everyone joined 
in the singing of school and popular songs. 

Act III. — The curtain falls. 

When speech failed everyone, they adjourned to the foyer where Mr. 
Annas again furnished music, this time for dancing. At ten o'clock the 
festivities ceased and all started for home. It was one of the most success- 
ful parties ever held, and will undoubtedly be repeated each year. Per- 
haps everyone didn't do it, but it may be safely said that everyone felt like 
singing, as they strolled homeward, "The End of a Perfect Day." 

Cecelia Chewning. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-ONE 



9 



%Mm4\ 



Down in Our Alley 



"Set 'em up, Jonesy." 

"Yes, wouldn't that be nice. But I did the formalities yesterday, so I 
won't argue with you if you insist on doing them today." 

"Well, let's flip up for it. Odd man sets 'em up for the gang. Every- 
body who isn't broke get in on this, if you want to bowl." 

"Heads." 

"Heads." 

"Tails," 

"Heads." 

"That's fair enough. The lady on the quarter didn't like to look at Wix." 

"Boy, show Garner to the pit. Make him take his coat off. That's the 
way." 

"Come on, Swede ! Strike 'em out." 

"Spare! Your're up, Jonesy." 

The alleys are indeed a source of infinite pleasure to the fellows, espec- 
ially from noon on. They are over-worked and the waiting list amuses it- 
self with a few basketballs, the rings, gym apparatus and so forth. Good 
scores are made often and several of the best bowlers even admit they are 
in the "200" class. Novelties are numerous, both in shots and shooters — 
Deak's two specialities are knocking down five strikes for a score of 120 or 
so, and smashing Tungsten globes with his head. Midds lovable little 
stunt is to be last man out at noon and throw all the balls down the alleys 
just 16 see them roll. Jonesy has a mysterious influence over "Mac" and 
always has nim set up the pins first. By the time it is "Mac's" turn to 
bowl the bell rings for Jonesy's fifth hour class and he is sorry, but he has 
to go. Wix takes the bacon when it comes to luck — or maybe it is accuracy 
— I don't know. 

Long live the bowling alleys ! We could not exist without them. 

Willard Smith. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-TWO 



jUiAfcA 



Baseball Prospects 

The success of the basketball season led to much discussion of baseball 
prospects, and late in the winter term it was decided that Northern Normal 
must be represented on the diamond as well as on the indoor court. Con- 
siderable difficulty was experienced in organization due to the fact that no 
regular coach is available. Mr. Wager who had handled basketball did not 
desire to continue athletic work, Mr. Oakland has too full a program 
because of his connection with the city school system, hence guidance of 
the baseball season fell upon Mr. Buzzard of the department of geography. 

Requisition was made upon the department of education in Springfield 
for the necessary equipment, and this requisition has been accepted. 
Probably some delay will be experienced due to the difficulty with which 
certain types of athletic supplies may be purchased. The 1917 uniforms 
are still brave in their blue stripes and crimson lettering, and the team 
will present a neat appearance upon the field. 

Due to the lateness of the decision to indulge in the national sport, 
arranging a schedule is being quite a problem. Most schools arranged 
dates for games during the winter. Consequently Northern Normal finds 
that few available dates exist, and these come practically at the same time 
during the season. At present writing it is not possible to give a complete 
schedule. Wheaton College will be met on the Northern Normal diamond 
only, as Wheaton is not able to arrange for a return game. Aurora College 
will be met both at Aurora and at DeKalb. Mt. Morris is to be treated 
in the same manner. Concordia College of Oak Park is most anxious to 
avenge the only defeat handed them during the last season before the war 
period, but since they cannot give a return game, Concordia will not be met. 
Negotiations are now on between Northern Normal and the following 
schools, and from them the remainder of the schedule will be made: St. 
Bede's College of Peru, St. Viator's of Bourbonnais, Chicago Technical Col- 
lege, Chicago Y. M. C. A. College, Joliet Junior College, Platteville Normal 
Wisconsin, Augustana College of Rock Island, and the Western Normal at 
Macomb. 

What degree of success shall Northern Normal expect on the diamond? 
Would that it might be foretold at present writing ! Baseball material is 
more plentiful than that for basketball. The fighting spirit is now abroad. 
We know that men of Northern Normal are equal to or superior in basketry, 
among Northern Illinois college men, why not in pounding the horsehide? 
Several of the prospective candidates have had what may be termed semi- 
professional experience, and many others have played on their respective 
high school teams. The superintendent of grounds has promised that the 
playing field will be one of the best in northern Illinois ; the state is furnish- 
ing all needed equipment; the faculty are giving all possible support; the 
student body is enthusiastic for the game; — and now, Mr. Weather Man, 
please ! 

Robert Guy Buzzard. 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-THREE 



-4 ^aMfcj 



9 

s 



&oc*>cn's mzhl€c\cs 




"'•Tttnnri 



Of all women's athletics here, perhaps, basketball is the most popular and 
the most beneficial to the individual. More than twenty-five girls came 
out for basketball this year. Many of them have had supervised athletics 
during all of their school life. Some have had practically no athletics and 
have never seen a basketball game. However, each is welcomed with the 
same enthusiasm and upon an equal basis for making good. 

Unselfish cooperation and fair play is the basis of all team work, through 
which a girl may learn self-reliance and responsibility. If a sense of honor 
and loyalty is made to mean anything, a girl must stand bravely by her 
team in defeat or victory. It is a great thing to learn to be a good loser ; 
to share victory and feel that some one else has done as much as one's self 
to win it. ' The spirit to be striven for is not grim determination to win 
at any cost, but the exhilaration and joy of playing. 

This spirit should not only exist among the players but should spread 
throughout the school body and faculty. School spirit is to a school what 
patriotism is to one's country. The enthusiasm and spirit which the school 
body and faculty show in athletics gives the team a greater incentive for 
playing a clean and fast game. The very play spirit and team work should 
tend to break up all antagonistic feelings among the girls and should cre- 
ate a common spirit of comradeship. 

The spirit in basketball this year has been of that latter type. This 
spirit has been largely made possible through our coach, Miss Foster. Her 
enthusiasm and sympathy for the play-spirit in girls has influenced many 
in realizing the real value of athletics. Her sense of humor and good com- 
radeship makes for the social spirit among the girls. In coaching she 
works for ideal playing a little beyond that which the players can accom- 
plish, but which develops each for individual efficiency. Her helpful spirit 
and patience influences the spirit of the players, as does her willingness 
to help every girl. 

The women's basketball season has been a very successful one this year, 
and we hope that the standardization of athletics next year will tend to 
create a finer school spirit and be an incentive to always strive to attain 
the ideal. Ruth Poley. 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-FOUR 



It 



1 



MiJ^I 



5 



Our Beginning 

Well, here we are in the gym, 

Twenty strong, decked in gym suits, 

The Seniors had early arrived 

To meet in the gym new girls en masse, 

In uniform all a-quake and a-quiver 

Imagining their role in initiation. 

That night: High stepping, shoe hunting, tipsy aero-planing. 

Later : Led thru dark uncanny halls to eats a plenty. 

Red headache bands, green anklets, gym shoes — to tell 



Next day 
the tale. 



Ruth Poley. 




To the Basket Ball 

You're so true dancing ball, they all say, 
You've made the score on many a day — 
Round and round from one to one, 
Never tiring till the game is done. 

Suddenly again you're thrown so high; 

Then you feel your owner's look and hear his sigh, 

And even though you touched the rim, 

You refuse for others to roll within. 

With you we make the straightest aims; 
With you we win the hardest games. 
You're the one with nerve and grit, 
Which proves to all that you are IT. 

Florence McCormick. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-FIVE 



9 



IE 



Mite^ 



dH 




A girl is not often found 

Who's so popular all the way 'round. 

As Ruth Poley this year. 

A captain without peer, 
For her judgment's always been sound. 

With Helen alert in her place 

There's no foe we're not able to face. 

Can she make every basket? 

You don't need to ask it — 
When it comes to that she's an ace. 



Beatrice Carmichael's center so true, 

When she's playing, the girls can't feel blue. 

On the bat-off, she's there 

With a confident air, 
Then she does what she finds to do. 

Gert Dennis, as all of us know, 
Is a guard to fight any foe. 

Altho she's not tall, 

She can get the ball 
And send it where it most needs to go. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-SIX 



! I 



A 



A 9 



tt 



mM=i 




Our girls are unusually blest, 
Their coach is one of the best — 

Her name, it is Foster, 

We're glad we've not lost 'er 
For few could stand under their test. 

There's another guard adding fame 
To the glory we already can claim. 

She sticks like Le Page's, 
Her spirits contagious, 
And Gertrude Thoman's her name. 



Ton what magic food does she feed, 
This Ethel Smith to get speed? 

Now she's here, now she's there 

'Fore her opponent's aware 
That her forward's no laggard indeed. 

Ruth Gilbert's a player of might, 
In a game she's full of the fight! 

She's got a good rep, 

Just oceans of pep, 
And she gets every ball that's in sight. 

Dorothy Hagadone. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-SEVEN 



9 



MiliM 



jff 




The Junior-Senior Game 

The players all stood ready, 

Each girl's face tense and flushed, 

The side lines ceased their talking 
And every voice was hushed. 

The center's short, sharp signals 

Rang thru the quiet gym. 
The whistle blew! Two arms shot up 

The game began with vim. 

The ball scarce touched the floor at all 

So quickly did it fly, 
From one girl's hands into the next 

Or towards the basket high. 

The guards, they guarded closely, 

The forwards battled well. 
The center's confidential spirit 

No mishap e'er could quell. 

One basket in! And then one more! 

The great room rang with cheers, 
The first half ends. Rah! Rah! Seniors! 

The score is three to four. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-EIGHT 



? 



It 



MiltL^ 



5 




The Junior-Senior Game — Continued 

Again the whistle sounds its call, 

The contest starts anew. 
With pep, each player plays the game 

Bound to see it thru. 

The Junior girls with teeth set tight 

Try to even up the score. 
The Seniors, using every means, 

To make their baskets more. 

The minutes seemed like seconds, 
Just three more minutes still. 

Are we discouraged, Seniors? 

No ! we fought with might and will. 

At last the game was ended, 
The Juniors shouted with glee. 

We'd lost the game, eleven to four 
A right good score, you see. 

We, therefore, can't be mournful, 

Because we all agree 
That the Juniors played a splendid game 

And so, in fact, did we. 



Ruth Gilbert. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-NINE 



B 



i i 



feilte=4 



5 




HALL 


10 


CLUB 


12 



Alice's Adventure in Normal Land 

On February 13th 

As Alice gazed about her she felt curiouser and curiouser. At one end 
of the room was this sign 



HALL 


CLUB 



"Oh, dear," thought Alice, "What does that mean? Are these people 
going to haul clubs or are they going to club the hall? Oh, how shall I 
decide it?" 

Just as Alice was getting into a perplexing discussion with herself over 
this question, six girls in black and white came running out. 

"Oh," thought Alice, "Maybe I can find out now how they haul clubs or 
club hauls." 

"The Doormouse," explained to Alice that the Clubs were the black and 
reds and the Halls the black and whites. 

She didn't understand this but she was too polite to interrupt so she 
watched the mouse's tail and the rest of this tale appeared this way to 
Alice, 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY 



<? 



It 



M§Jilff4 



5 




RAH ! RAH ! 
RAH ! RAH ! 
HALL ! 



RAH! 
RAH! 



Soon the game 

was on and 

Alice watched a 

lively chasing, 

grabbing, and 

throwing of the 

ball. The whistle 

blew and the 

girls left the 

floor and drank 

from a bottle labeled 

"Drink me, Lemme Aid." 

The rooters gave peppy yells. 

The board said 



RAH! 
RAH! 



RAH ! RAH ! 
RAH ! RAH ! 
CLUB ! 



HALL 6 


CLUB 4 



and Alice decided 

they were going to 

"haul the club." During 

the peppy last half intense 

interest was there. When 

the end came Alice decided that 

they had "clubbed the hall." 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-ONE 



-4^aiiLj 




Heard at Practice 



"All right, girls, organize your teams and get some signals. Reds this 
way, yellows that. (This rather indefinite statement is further explained 
by a glance at each basket.) (Whistle) I didn't hear any signals then. 
Reds out! 1-2-3. Oh, girls! that's terrible bunching. Good one! She 
wouldn't have made that basket though if it hadn't been for your pass. 
Come on now girls — use some team work — Good! Running guard where 
are you? — why aren't you up here? Shoot it! Oh, there was no reason 
for not making that basket. Spread out! All right play it. Why did- 
n't you signal? Good sticking. Signal! — Signal! Girls this isn't foot- 
ball. Yellow out. Center what are you doing with that ball? — get out 
where you belong. Hard luck! Where are your false signals? Use 
them. A fine pass. Shoot! That shows what good team work will do. 
Rest a minute. Miss — off, Miss — on. Change baskets. Now girls, 
spread out. Jump here. Foul — didn't keep you arm behind you. Make 
it! Good! All right, go ahead. Break that up — get in there, guard. 
Jump. Too bad — it should have gone in — Shoot! That was as good as 
a pass. Stick to your man more. Won't go in — too straight a shot. 
There's no need of wiping up the floor, girls. Good work. Where was 
your unguarded signal? — Make it! — A pretty one! We'll try one more 
bat off. Quick work. Girls, you showed some good team work tonight and 
you put up a good fight, too. There were some nice baskets made. I 
think we have a pretty good proposition here, don't you? That's all 
girls — leave your strings. Gertrude Dennis. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-TWO 



MilM 



iff 



The Sandwich Man 

I never saw a Sandwich man 

I never hoped to see one. 
'Till the other day in General Ex. 

There came a very real one. 

He hurried up and down the aisles 

A bell he rang quite loudly, 
"We'll win that Elgin game! We'll win!" 

It seemed to sing out proudly. 

Genevieve Grote. 




Did you see the Elgin game? 

Our team worried before the game, but 

Normal won, 31-4. 

Our team worried before the game, but 

Those girls certainly showed fine spirit. 

This game wasn't as peppy as the Rockford one, but 

At that we won, 12-4. 

What's the matter with the team? 

They're all right! 

Who's all right? 

The Team ! 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-THREE 



1 

o 

.A 



m$ifc& 



B - Il ksWrW ^tll^ m g 



November Eleventh 

Hark, to the noise of that blaring sound! 

See the parades that are marching round! 

Hear how the cheers resound and rebound 

"The Armistice 'signed!" "The Armistice 'signed!" 

The cries pound the great news into the mind. 

The sidewalks and streets with people are lined, 

Crying out, crying out, "The Armistice ' signed !" 

"Peace. * * * * Peace. 

Christ grant the world a lasting peace." 

Peace — the eternal hope of nations drowned in war. 

Peace — the paradise promised by every religion. 

We were at war — and now we are at peace. 

We cried out long before the cannon's noise would cease. 

And with panting breath we arrived at the threshold of dawn 

Bearing with us victory — life, love, liberty — peace. 

Stand ! 

Face east! 

And in the glory of the rising sun perceive the dead, 

Leave to the desolate silences the tear, 

And bring to the hearthstone of your life 

The regenerate powers of sacrifice and hope. 

List to the whispering wind, 
"Peace * * * Peace." 
It is a promise. 

J. G. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-FOUR 



n- t ^Hk JRLfirdtt 



Better Speech Week 



We'd set aside a week by name of "Better Speech," 

It's days we spent in study, toil, one and each, 

We strove to speak the language our lustrous forbears spoke, 

We learned, our teachers taught us, 

Hearts were broken, not were broke! 

We'd set aside our slang, ourselves we were no more! 

We conversed with Mr. Webster our daily word to score, 

We said "good-bye" to "gosh" and "darn" and all that sort 

of thing. 
We won! And Friday found us slang broken! 
Better speech our king! 

Nora Tully. 



'Every year, one vicious habit rooted out in time ought to make the worst man good: 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-FIVE 



9 



:MiJ^=4 




A Critic's Dream 



*? CRITIC in the night, in the dark, dark night, 
Had a dream, oh, a dreadful dream: 
She dreamed that she died and to Peter applied 
To sing by the golden stream. 
Then Peter did glare at the critic there, 

And said in an awful voice, 
"Oh, daring woman! Oh, woman, you dare 
Without penance to sing and rejoice, — 
Rejoice; 
Without penance to sing and rejoice?" 

Said she to the saint, "What is the complaint, 

And what penance do you demand? 
Oh, have I not toiled, and have I not wailed? 

In spite of all this, am I cann'd?" 
"You must hurry away for a month and a day, 

To the school which your students conduct, 
And there all the day, without fail you must stay, 

Noting down all wrong things they instruct, — 
Instruct ; 
Noting down all wrong things they instruct." 

"But, Peter, how cruel, to make such a rule, 

A punishment, oh, so drear, 
Why can't you amend it, I can only stand it 

For a day, or two days, Peter, dear." 
"Like Wilson, I'll not change a comma or dot." 

Cried Peter, his eyes agleam. 
Just then in the night, the critic awoke 

To find it was only a dream, — 
A dream; 
To find it was only a dream. 

Marna Peterson. 



'Not till we are old is it that we learn to know what we met with when young." 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-SIX 



ft 




What You Are to Us 




IRST of all you are folks, real live folks, human as we all are, 
with our likes and dislikes, our own fashion of doing things, our 
own manner of expressing ourselves, our own ways of feeling and 
understanding. Wouldn't this be a tiresome place to live in if we 
were not so different '! But to be "folks" means more than being a per- 
son — it means you are our people; we are especially interested in your 
goings and comings; you "belong," and once having become one of us, you 
remain so, whether you live here or elsewhere, whether your big problem 
lies in the schoolroom or outside it, whether you want to or not. 

Beyond this you a special kind of person. Therein lies our real interest 
in you. What inheritance you have had, what your environment has done 
for you, what you are doing with your abilities, what possibilities lie be- 
fore you with these as a background all these make "you." And you 

are a constant revelation. We never know the all of you any more than 
we know all about any one of our own folks. But with the understanding 
we have, we try to add our bit to your personality. 

With these two things in mind, we come to the fact that you are a 
teacher. Your immediate problem is to help each individual child to take 
care of himself, to make the most of himself. Your tools must be good, 
in good condition, modern; your ways of doing your work should be the 
best; your standards, ideals, should be the highest; the result should be 
your guide and test of future tools and methods. 

And so we criticize. 

Elsie Wendling. 



"The next thing to having wisdom ourselves is to profit by that of others." 

PAGE. ONE HUNDRED FORTY-SEVEN 



i 



y^AN 



9 

«5? 



dS 



The Training School 

How we love the Training School, 
With all its girls and boys 

Just bubbling over with laughter, 
And making a great deal of noise. 



How the children trip up the stairway, 

And hurry through the halls, 
As the last bell rings through the building, 

And calls, and calls, and calls. 

They sometimes come to school early, 

For just a chat with you, 
To tell of the parties they've had, 

And what they'd like to do. 

They're good at clever joking, 

And sometimes the joke's on you — 

For you looked from the window that morning, 
And heard them call, "April Fool !" 

Grace Miller. 



"He that gives good advice and good wisdom, builds with both hands.' 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-EIGHT 



It 



MiJ&M 



At the Glidden 

At the Glidden School house window 

Gazing calmly o'er the way, 
There's a critic teacher sitting, and 

I know she thinks o' me; 
For the careless board work lesson 

And the dusty erasers say: 
"Come you back you student teacher, 

Come you back without delay!" 

Come you back without delay ! 

Linger not as if you may ; 
Can't you feel your right ear burning 

Ere you meet her on the way ? 
On the road without delay 

For your shirking now to pay — 
And the shivers up your spine 

Do not calm your fears away. 

When the warnings are all over 

And I feel at ease once more, 
She gets her little notebook out and 

Looks it through and through. 
With her arm upon my shoulder 

She starts right in anew: 
"Your arithmetic is coming fine 

Have history do that too !" 

By the blackboard with a pointer, 

Drilling tables with a will, 
Or in planning reading projects, 

In a grade school far away, 
You will have a grateful feeling 

For old Glidden and its critics 
You would gladly hear them say: 

"Come you back you student teacher, 
Come you back without delay!" 

Helen Aberg. 



"Experience is a jewel, for it is often purchased at an infinite rate." 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-NINE 



When Our Checks Come In 

How are we student teachers compensated for our daily labors with the 
children in the practice schools ? Our checks come with interesting irreg- 
ularity and vary widely in value. The fact is due partly to the fact that we 
are doing piece work instead of receiving pay for the time spent at our 
posts. Our checks are not recognized by the bank or merchants. Even 
we may not always receive the full benefit from our checks, for they must 
be endorsed with a smile and cashed with appreciation. 

Our first check comes in the form of a pleasant word of commendation 
from our critic teacher for the model teaching of a poem. But alas! the 
next day a bill to exceed our account appears — not one child remembers so 
much as a line of the poem. And after attempting to bring out the beauty 
of this verse one child persists in speaking of the "fleasy snow" as though 
it were the infested coat of a stray dog. 

But practice teaching is a wellpaying employment the next day, for we 
are overwhelmed with wealth. Mary Helen's mother is visiting and being 
the first visitor of the term has worked a charm with the children. They 
become little models of industry and recite like wee artists. 

Small bills for damages are constantly coming in — damages against the 
children's intellect and morals, for which we pay dearly with regret and 
not infrequently embarassment. After telling the story of Cinderella 
with its high ideals of love and kindness portrayed in the beautiful cinder 
maid, why should the children, when asked what made Cinderella's face 
so beautiful say, "powder?" In the midst of one of those almost-ideal 
reading lessons Kenneth raises his hand — Oh! he is thinking for himself 
Indeed he is, and in a flash is telling us about the funny, wabbly calves 
he saw at the stock show. And though we finally turn the discussion 
to the Sun-bonnet Babies and their kitten, half of the class are claiming 
a chance to talk calves while the other half have dropped their books or 
rolled out of their seats. At this point the critic teacher enters and the 
bill of shame is marked "C. 0. D." 

Sometimes our debts, hard though we try to economize, exceed our 
income. Do not criticize our extravagance, for it may be that our sadly 
bent finances are, at the eleventh hour, appreciably mended with the over- 
worked sympathy of our critic and a final teaching card of the term. Or 
this may be so nearly true to fact that our finances snap and we find our- 
selves bankrupt, with our creditors claiming the profits from another term 
of practice teaching! 

Mildred Julian. 



"Every experience in life is a teacher^ 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY 



9 



Senior Trials 



a 



We hasten each morning to teaching, 

At one, at classes we're due. 
From then till three-thirty we're busy 

With Algebra and History to do. 

Then when the day seems over, 

To Library class till four; 
We Seniors sigh and wonder 

Can they pile on any more? 

At last our work is over, 

But very sad to say, 
We feel a sudden longing 

At dear N. I. to stay. 

Helen Vogel. 

Our Wants Are Few 

Little I ask, my wants are few ; 

Give me a room all cosy and bright, 
For neighbors a pleasant chum or two, 

And no studies on any week-end night, 
A box of candy now and then, 
A little more than I wish to spend. 

A girl should dress in cheap attire, 

Fine heavy middies of wool, in blues, — 

I own I might perhaps desire 
Some sweaters in assorted hues, 

Some pretty gowns of georgette crepe 

With hats to match and a handsome cape. 

For studies — little psychology, 

At math and physics, I'd rather not grind, 
Field trips, no lab in biology; 

Reading or history I should not mind. 
On music, phonics I'll not discourse, 
Nor on pamphlets for a library course. 

So let me fare at this Normal school, 

Attending the Armory or Peck's, 
And study some and pupils rule, 

Until it's I the "supe" elects. 
And when I'm in that nice position 
I'll still "come back" — a la tradition. 

Margaret Johnson. 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-ONE 



MiJfci a 

When She Needs a Friend 

Oh ! the merry time the Proctor has, there's nothing can compare, 
There's no time when you need friends more than when you're in the 

Proctor's chair. 
There's your usual visits to the rooms, where study's not at stake, 
They say that they are hungry and of luncheon must partake. 
Then they all begin to whisper and you ask them to refrain 
From doing things annoying, and tell them to act sane. 

When the girls give you their promises, that no further noise they'll 

make, 
You retrace your steps back to your room, where your studies all 

await. 
You try once more to settle down, to the mysteries of your work, 
When suddenly you'll hear the sound of laughter and of mirth. 
You gently knock upon the door, from where the fun's at stake, 
And some one tries to ease your mind, by offering you some cake ! 

Oh, the merry role of Proctor, it's either this or that to mend, 
For one cannot count the times at night when a Proctor really needs 
a friend. 

Elizabeth N. Hosty. 



The Proctor 



The Proctor! Oh the Proctor! 
She always spoils our fun, 
For if we make a bit of noise 

She's sure to make us run. 
Now every time we have a spread 

A knock comes at the door; 
"There's too much noise — the rules you know — 

I won't warn you any more." 

The Proctor ! Oh, the Proctor ! 

Why need she be so stern? 
Now we could be quite deaf and blind, 

Just wait 'till it comes our turn. 
The Proctor says she'll tell Miss Branch 

If we break too oft a rule, 
Miss Branch will tell our Dr. Brown 

And he'll tell us to leave the school. 

Marina Yetter. 

"Have a time and place for everything, and do everything in its time and place.' 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-TWO 



It 



M«!^ 



The Box From Home 



The other day I got a card from a girl who lives in "Chi," 

She wrote : "I'm sending you a box ; with lots of love, good-bye." 

I madly ran out of my room and went to tell the news, 

I said, I'm going to have a spread to take away the blues. 

The box arrived ; so did the girls. We all were so excited, 

And they all cried with one accord : "We're glad we were invited." 

I opened up the box and right on top there was a note, 

And while the girls stood all around I read them what she wrote : 

I know you're fond of reading as I often heard you say, 

So I'm sending you some literature which was in my way. 

Of course it's not all up-to-date, but you won't mind a bit, 

I know if I had sent you "eats" you would have had a fit." 

I took the contents from the box ; the girls stood all around, 

And laughed and giggled in great glee for this is what I found : 

A Woman's Home Campanion from 1894, 

And several daily papers from before the World's Great War, 

Four Literary Digests from last August and September, 

An almanac which was so old, the date I can't remember. 

Now let me tell you, next time that box arrives from home, 

I'm going to lock my door and open up the thing alone. 

Geraldine Peterson. 




'Abuse me as much as you will, but don't make me ridiculous." 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-THREE 



it 



i^iliifc^z 



View Points of the Elevator 

Ho hum! that pesky rising bell! Why does it have to be rung every 
morning. I'm sure that I can wake up when it is time. I guess I'll take 
a nap until I am needed. Oh, dear ! here comes one of those seniors who 
always is hurrying and never takes time to chew her meals. I'll fix it so 
she can't hurry me Jerk ! Jerk ! Now get impatient and see if I care. Ha .! 
Ha! You'll get there after a few more jerks. Tug! Tug! Goodness, 
some one seems to be in a great hurry. I wish she wouldn't press the 
button so hard. My, I am dirty! My floor has not been scrubbed since 
yesterday morning and it is covered with scraps of paper those careless 
girls dropped. How kind of you, maid, to scrub my floor. You are even 
washing the finger prints off of my glass door ! I hope the girls will notice 
when they ride this noon. Stay on, I will take your brooms down to the 
basement for you. That horrid laundry man has tracked my floor all up 
with his muddy boots! It is too bad that he can't even walk to second 
floor. The girls are here from fourth hour already and Mr. Hale is feed- 
ing me my grease. They must take the stairs, but they need not begrudge 
me my one meal a week. Then they'll make me rush again until my ropes 
whirl. 

Here comes Miss Dewey! Just watch her balancing her tray so care- 
fully. Here is where I have some fun. Up, up, up, we go ! Jer-r-k ! I'm 
sorry, Miss Dewey, that the loganberry juice spilled on that napkin, but 
you know there are always more loganberries in the kitchen. To show 
you that I am a good sport I'll take you down. It might be a good plan 
to take the stairs the next time. I guess I'll take a rest till supper time. 
Now, what do that silly Junior and Senior want with me? We go up to 
the third floor — and down to the basement — and up again! I wonder if 
they aren't taking a joy ride! My, how they giggle! Oh, ho! Here 
come Miss Branch. I guess they won't take a joy ride again so soon. 
Who's down in the basement at this time of the night? I smell candy. 
Who is pulling my door open — so — quietly? Oh, two rulebreakers with 
two plates of hot candy. Up we go! Up we go! I will — not — go 
— any — far-ther! What a surprise — and you dare not ring my bell to 
bring help. Some one seems to be p-u-1-l-i-n-g me from above. Is it Miss 
Branch? No, only two rescuers waiting for the candy. There! They 
forgot to close my door. Now someone will have to close it in the morn- 
ing before I will move another inch. 

Ethel Smith. 



'Dull is the jester when the joke's unkind." 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY- FOUR 



Normal Bells 

Hear the matron ring the bells! 
Rising bells ! 
What a Hall of drowsiness their melody dispells! 

How they jerk, and jarr, and jangle 

In the crispy air of morn, 
While the students strive and strangle 

With a tangle all forlorn — 

Marching down, down, down, 

With a giggle or a frown, 
To the brazen babbulation that so bountifully tells 

Of the codfish or the muffins, 

Corn like bullets, oatmeal porridge, 
Sunday Pancakes — if the crowd is not too great. 

Hear the bright five-minute bells! 
Blessed bells! 
What a world of worriment their ringing oft impel] s ! 

In the halls so long and bright 

How the student's piteous plight 

Of a wasted study night 

Drowns the clammer of the bells for class to start. 
What a sense of sinking fills one when all knowledge does depart. 

Hence, we'll strive to start our study 

With a chum or 'anybuddy' 

When the seven-thirty bells 

Of our resolution tells. 

Hear the ringing of the bells! 
Telephone bells! 
What a radiant group of maidens on their invitation dwells! 

How they call from every floor 

Girls who say it is a bore 

Just to hear the men imlpore 

Them for a date. 

How the girls then have to hurry — 

Some are calm, some in a flurry, 
When the br-br-br-bring, br-br-bring, br-br-bring of the doorbell starts 

And the man in happy state [to ring. 

Has to wait, wait, wait — 

Fearing lest there be no time 

Till he hears the last bell chime; 
For he is here to tell of the dread ten-thirty bell — 

When he bids farewell to his belle. 

Ah! fair belle, belle, belle, belle, 

Belle, belle, belle! 

Mildred Julian. 
"Better be three hours too soon than one minute too late." 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-FIVE 



Keeping the Law 

Our coal supply was very low, 

The days were very cold, 
We put on clothes and shut off lights, 

And did as we were told. 

At half-past nine o'clock one morn, 

I ran in to a store; • 
Ordered what I wanted, 

And started for the door. 

"Dear Madam, I am sorry, 

You must not haste away, 
I can not sell you anything, 

'Till ten o'clock today." 

The next day at eleven, 

I hurried to a shop; 
The door was locked, 

The man inside, just pointed to the clock. 

For a chance to spend some money, 

I must stand around an hour; 
The man was very penitent, 

And I was very sour. 

You couldn't count upon the trains, 

To take you back or forth, 
For the one that went south yesterday, 

Today was running north. 

At night the street lights all were out, 

From end to end of town, 
We had to step most carefully, 

To keep from falling down. 

We knew as good Americans, 

We must neither scold nor shirk, 
'Till the troubles were adjusted, 

And the miners back at work. 

Margaret Powers. 



"Keep the law, for it is your law." 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-SIX 



M«IN8 



E Ib ^ffff'N MStFz M jg 



Getting the Flu 

One night I didn't feel so spry, 

So away I went to bed. 
My feet I put at the foot end, 

But soon they were at the head. 

The bed posts wagged their heads at me, 

Their faces darker grew. 
The pillows shivered at my feet, 

The covers shivered too. 

The dresser danced about the room, 

My shoes began to grow. 
Then m walked all my teachers, 

And stood there in a row. 

The ceiling came to meet the floor, 
The windows shone with glee. 

While everything made a face 
And pointed straight at me. 

The doctor came and shook his head 

And gazed in a solemn way, 
"You have the flu, my son," he said, 

"And now in bed you stay." 

Walter Albertson. 



"A mill, a skip, and a woman, are always preparing" — also a man. 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-SEVEN 



9 



&m$ifc& 



General Ex* Left-Overs 

Reader's Guide — Juniors and Freshmen will kindly reflect on the compo- 
sition of hash e're perusing this page. Our worthy writer has gathered 
the remains and rubbish of the past year into one heap of typographical 
hash. 

CHARACTERS 

Dr. Brown: School physician for en- Two Seniors: Apparently teaching, lad- 

trance delirium, fluncations, graduation en with library books and worries, 

doubts, and general ills. Freshmen: Seeking a Senior to guide 

Dean Gilbert: Assistant physician and them to their classes, 

specialist in psycho-sociologies. Several Juniors: Exchanging definitions 

t, , „. _, . . and gossip, and receiving in all a very 

Prof. Wager: Game crier and master blurred idea of Normal 

of creeping things. Front Row; Fu „ of Faculty) j^^ 

Miss Mann: Mistress of our family and Seniors, waiting to cry their wares. 

trees. Always Right: Normal boys, 28^ at 

Miss Jandell: Mistress of shelves and recent census allowing for approximate 

silence. losses and gains. 

Miss Merritt: The woman wno drew Happy Medium: The Seniors, every 

art from the East one looking toward the "Presidency." 

Mr. Parson: Professor of the unknown. , , Th , ose Left: J unior S irls ' bus y> bri S ht ' 

blundering. 
Mr. Buzzard: Professor of everything And Me; Just an ordinary; str aight- 

on earth. haired, Senior girl, heavy on her feet, light 

Mr. Vaughn: Official debator of N. I. j n her head, who is always chirping at the 

S. N. S. wrong time. 

I got into the Assembly hall early so that I could let all my neigh- 
bors climb over me to their places and stand on my toes as they took 
their breath to go on. Then I watched the Faculty file in and 
ascend to their seats of honor. Mr. Page crossed his legs so deliberately 
I knew he must have a new relic. Mr. Vaughn gave three of his short 
coughs — that meant that he was about to speak. Dr. Brown looked at 
Miss Jandell — and then she read three and half yards of library rules and 
a great list of fines. I wonder why she read my name first? Mr. Parson 
and Mr. Vaughn told us how to vote — no, they were debating — no, they 
weren't, for Miss Whitman said that it was not a debate., Well, after all 
we didn't know how to vote on the treaty but we did know that we'd vote 
unanimously for Mr. Vaughn as joke-master. 

"There will be a Junior class meeting in the Study Hall immediately 
after General Ex." That sounded like a party. "All Seniors must arrange 
a time with Mr. Natusch — " "May I call upon the co-operation of the 
whole school for a game scheduled Friday night of this week ? Show your 
school spirit!" "Some one will be in the office every hour tomorrow to 
take Senior class dues." "Miss Parker has a fountain pen — ." 

Mildred Julian. 



"A weak intellect doesn't prevent a man from being headstrong." 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-EIGHT 



9 



n fk #N J!hLfe=J D _ J 



The Bulletin Board 

Oh, let us look at the bulletin board, 

The bulletin board that hangs on the wall, 
The brown-canvassed board, the much-used board, 

The bulletin board that hangs in the hall. 
That be-papered board oft claims our attention 

When up tc our classes we hasten along. 
Money not paid by names we might mention, 

Vacations, and games enough for a throng. 
There's the Treble Clef notice, and a key that's been 
found, 

Clever posters for Y. W. and T. H. E. attract all. 
There often are many all crowded around 

The favored square board that hangs in the hall, 
The much-noticed board, the thumb-tacked old board, 

The bulletin board that hangs in the hall. 

Gyla May Butler. 



Echoes in the Halls 

How are you going to vote? — Land knows — guess I'll have to flip a 
quarter — either number three or four — Mr. Vaughn's little chuckle — but 
wasn't it a scream ? — Oh, wait — I must get that Review of Reviews — read 
that piece on the League or Mr. Page will — Mr. Parson did — and some of 
the ground of the world — couldn't forget that unknown quantity Article 
X (x) — See Mr. Page — didn't he squirm around — and his face — Miss Whit- 
man — her dignity — Wonder if anyone knows — point — My goodness — if Mr. 
Vaughn had called time on me three times — I hazard — senatorial reser- 
vation on that library book or — Mercy I must see — does know something 
besides just varnish, or screws, or joints — how to debate — no, no — 
Miss Whitman said "Discuss" — speaking seriously — this is finished. 

Ruth S. Miller. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-NINE 



4 i<3feiiife^ [ 



£brnnnlimtt tlye y*ar tlje play uiaa yfuen: 

A masque mitt? romtffry romhin^Ji, 

iUany scenes were fnU of tanyljter, 

STlje nante, tlje party, ana tlje sport, 

Many mnr* Jjelfl oeeper meanings 

^jfet all mere playri* by earnest, milling players. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY 



It 



M§J^4 



5 




As it Was in October 

i. And it came to pass in the one thous- 
and nineteen hundred and nineteenth year, 
in the seventh month of the year, on the 
twenty-ninth day of the month that the 
Big Man, surnamed Brown, did enter and 
take up his reign as tetrach of all the 
Northern Normal Land. 

2. And many were as strangers in a 
strange land, and did wander about in a 
state of bewilderment and were of envy 
of those that did conduct themselves with 
the familiar feeling of knowing how. 

3. Then, according to the writ of com- 
mand placed before use did we set our- 
selves diligently to the making of our plans 
for daily labor, which are kept on record 
in the place of safe keeping. 




did wonder and seek to know the how and 
why of the Big Man. And we were soon 
perplexed to know whether he had said, 
"Depart Ye." 

5. Withal, was there much rejoicing by 
the damsels — yea, the Wise Ones likewise, 
for to the Land had returned those that 
had gone to the camps and across the seas 
and no more was the Land to be without 
deep-voiced and the strong ones — the gal- 
lant Man. 

6. And those that were strangers in a 
strange land, did sicken with longing for 
home and for days they did go about with 
long faces, and some did say, "cast out 
thy sad hearts and cease thy wailing." 




4. And we did gather for the first time 
in this year in the Great Room and all 



7. Then the damsels who fashion gar- 
ments and brew savory dishes did jour- 
ney to the Windy City and inspecition did 
pass on the dumb creatures they saw there. 

8. For days maidens did go about in 
strange garb, as if distraught with unsight- 
ly seams displayed to view. Wherefore? 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-ONE 



I J, 



E= 



«te^4 



^ 



That they might be classed with the song- 
sters of this Land and be known abroad 
as one of the Treble Clef. 

9. And some did go about in cars on 
study nights, even till told not to, but 




duties to the Land; so he was brought be- 
fore the high tribunal, tried, and convicted 
even so! 

15. And again did they that Know It 
All come together and choose certain from 
among them to set down the Chronicles of 
the year in the book of the Land, the Nor- 
ther, that it might be continued as it was 
since the beginning. 

16. And in the region of the building 
in which the Historian dwelleth there is 
a lady of clear mind, and understanding 
al, concerning the baby and the ball, who 
goeth about with glad countenance. All do 
know the wherefore and foolish ones stand 
about and gaze that perchance they may 
behold the Gem. 



the laws of the land are abandoned and 
all may go about without fear, and we do 
wander to the movies, often. Yea, we 
repeat, very often. 

10. And on this day, those that know 
it all were gathered together and did choose 
a chief or leader from among their ranks 
and the lot fell to the Great Smith. 

n. And it came to pass that those that 
had wandered as strangers did come to- 
gether and elect a King over them that 
he might embolden them in the presence 
of those that Know It All. 

12. Then did stand before us a youth 
of the name Castle, surnamed Brown, even 
the son of the Big Man; and he did make 
sweet musick with a stringed instrument. 
And all who listened did say with one ac- 
cord, Come Again! 

13. And were chosen scribes and shekel 
gatherers from among both tribes of the 
Land, to cause to be set down in permanent 
record the happenings of the months in 
order, in the Northern Illinois. 

14. Then became noised abroad the 
crime of the youth Hallaron, that he did 
beguile one of the Wise Ones to the Mis- 
tress of Art to the jitney and forsook his 



According to 
November 

1. And it came to pass that there was 
dancing and great jollity in the gym and 
the floor of the merriment place was 
waxed exceeding smooth like unto glass. 
But keep thine own counsel lest the chief 
ruler of the domain wax wroth and there 
be no more dancing. 




2. Then did the Big Man appear before 
the mulitude and he spoke unto them in 
this wise, "For one week shall ye put 
away all naughtiness in words, all slang 
and foolish utterances." Then was there 
calamity in the Land. Even the rulers 
were stricken with dumbness and durst not 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-TWO 



ft 



mM^ 



& 



open their lips, lest they practice not what 
they preach. 

3. And Page, the Historian, did stand 
before one of his group and ask concerning 
one damsel called Ruth, surnamed Fluck, 
"And think ye, would ye be much missed 
if ye wert taken from this land by one from 
the tribe of Mexicans?" 

4. And many came to cast themselves 
before the Chief of Players to enter into 
the company of those who play. 

5. Then the Pedagogues of the tribe 
of Seniors were of long faces and sorrow- 
ing hearts, for on this day was Institute 
held. 

6. And the youth Hallaron did go about 
with shining countenance for had he not 
received a date from the hands of one 
called Doris? 

7. And on this day in remembrance, 
we did gather in the Great Room, and for 
one minute did stand with faces toward 
the land where war had ceased, in rever- 
ence to Our Boys who remained there. 
And one did sound Taps. So it was over 
all the land. 

8. And the jolly ones, the dancers of 
the land, were of heavy eye and weary 
feet, for this is the day after and they 
did dance in the ball-room of the town 
and make merry for many hours. 

9. And signs did appear along the way 
saying, "Your Heart and Your Dollar for 
the Red Cross today." 

10. And lo! The spirit of Pep came 
into the midst of the multitude that had 
gathered in the place of meeting and ex- 
ceeding loud was the noise, seeming to 
burst their throats. 

n. In these days did some from the 
tribe Who Know All gather in the place 
of parchments and seek knowledge and un- 
derstanding in the Book of Words for the 
Keeper of the Parchments. 

12. And we did gather and tribute pay 



to a former master in our land, and for a 
perpetual memory a tablet of bronze did 
they erect in the foyer. 

13. Then did the shekel gatherer, 
Smith of the Big Words, stand forth and 
speak thus: All those who have not got — 
and then did he strangely lack utterance. 

14. And the damsels who dwell in the 
Great Hall did eat and celebrate the feast 
of Thanksgiving. 




15. And everyone in the Land did scat- 
ter and go to the Home Lands, and all did 
make merrie with eating and drinking, even 
unto fullness. 



mum iiiiiiii 

And it Happened in 
December 

1. That they of the Mops and Brooms 
did make us to stand and show forth our 
feet and judgement did they pass thereon. 

2. And Smith, the Great, stood before 
the Wise Ones and spake unto them, be- 
seeching them, entreating them, to pass on 
the light of their countenances. 

3. And our Brave Battling Warriors 
did journey to the Land of Lewis and were 
sorely beaten. 

4. And before the assembly that had 
gathered did the Master of Musick make 
passing sweet musick and all were greatly 
pleased. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-THREE 



f£? 9 



It 



5. On this day was fashioned the Seal 
of the Land for the tribe of Seniors. 

6. A damsel whom they call Elveria did 



jMite4 



5 




think to save time, even to glass-breaking 
and she did go through the closed door. 

7. And the young children did frolic 
before their elders in the Great Room, 
even with motley clowns and Santa of the 
Land of Toys. 

8. And great were the sounds of lamen- 
tation heard throughout this Land, for the 
Wise Ones did search and test for wisdom 
that should have been gained. 

9. And we did gather in the Assembly 



11. And those who had completed their 
learning in this Land were given the roll 
of Sheep Skin and they passed in review 
before us with great honor. 

12. And again did our Brave Warriors 
go forth in battle and they did return with 
triumph, wonderful to relate. 

13. And the land was deserted once 
more for days numbering seventeen, yea 
delightful days even so. 

14. And judgments were passed on the 
Xams and sent out through the country 
beyond the Land, to all members of any 
of the tribes. 

15. And we do wish unto you this day, 
ah manner of good things and a Right 
Merrie Christmas. 



iiiiini iiniiii 



And it Was in January 

1. And greetings were in abundance for 
the year that was very new, when all did re- 
turn from lands distant to continue their 
work here. 

2. And he of the Physics Laboratory, 




X ->■ >. -^- 



while the songsters, the Treble Clefers, did 
sing and carol forth, songs of Christmas 
cheer. 

10. Then one did dance before us and 
give us diverse exercises concerning our 
breathing and delight us with account of 
the doings of those who lived in the 
Doll's House. 




the concocter of foul odors, did slip and 
welter about in a bank of snow. 

3. And the keepers of the lunch count- 
er, the mixers of toothsome dishes, did 
serve us at the hour of noon with many 
good things. 

4. And men did work with horses and 
tcols of scraping to clear the stretch of 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-FOUR 



A 



4, .1 



ft 



#ajnfc4 



^ 



frozen water so the young of the Land 
might skate upon the icy smoothness. 

5. And twice it happened, one eventide 
after another that our Brave Battling War- 
riors did prove their prowess and strength 
and the multitude rejoiceth in the victories. 

6. On this day the Big Man did go 
about and investigate all places of the 
realm where maids did learn the art of 
teaching. And he spake unto them words 
of praise and cheer that heartened them 
greatly. 

7. And our spirits again did become 
glad for our warriors did gain another vic- 
tory from those from Naperville. 

8. And the tribes of the Juniors and 
Seniors did gather and prepare for a good 
time together in the place of dancing. 

9. And there was a time that the noble 
King Arthur lay in pieces, while the Mis- 
tress of Art did seek to make more beau- 
tiful this place of habitations. 

10. And the Land was without coal and 
we did shiver and shake and turn up our 




m 



coat collars, but still did we keep at our 
tasks, envious of those who were more 
fortunate than we. 

n. And the warrior maidens of our 
Land did contest hold with other of their 
kind from the place called Rockford and 
a victory did they take and make fame 
thereby. 



12. And the Mistress of the Voice 
gathered those who did long for the sweet 
songs of the opera and all did go to the 
Windy City to see and hear the Great Per- 
formers. 

13. At this time was the Land in sor- 
row for the Brave Battling Warriors did 
fight well but Wheaton warriors were 
strong and did wrest from them a victory. 

14. And the Wise Ones of this Land 
did discourse hold concerning the League 
of Nations, before the Simple Ones that 
had gathered in the Great Room. And 
the Simple Ones did find themeslves of 
even less understanding than they wot. 

15. Then many in this Land and other 




lands were smitten with the plague pre- 
vailing over the country called the Flu, 
and all were sore afraid. 

16. And the Historian, the collector of 
attic treasures, put on display strange ap- 
parel for the feet in warning to all fair 
damsels. 

17. Look ye, and behold! A damsel 




appears with new and beflowered straw 
headgear. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-FIVE 



I JL 



It 



And it Came to Pass 
in February 

i. That if the first day be bright and 
full of sunshine, the dumb creatures will a 
shadow cast, and weeks numbering six will 
be of the cold winter weather. 

2. Then our Brave Battling Warriors 
did go forth once more and make war 
against the Wheaton stronghold and broke 
down their defense. 

3. But the land is sorely in need of 
criers and trumpeters; those who can sound 
forth Pep in the form of Yells. 

4. The young children, youths and 
maidens and Wise Ones of the Land did 



i^&Mi 




meet in the Great Room to do honor and 
reverence to the day of Linocln. 

5. And this is the time of great excite- 
ment among the young children for tokens 
of papers, laces, hearts and bright colors 
are given one to another. 

6. And the Pedagogue of the elements 
of the land, air and water, did stand be- 
fore and gaze long upon dainty gowns in 
a shop window. Wherefore? 

7. And the young children do play with 
round bits of hardened clay, a game called 
mibs. 

8. And of bodices and flounces and 
pantlettes were the gowns made and hair 
was powdered white for the gay time in 



honor of the birth anniversary of the 
Father of His Country. And it was voiced 
with one voice, that we had a good time. . . 

0. Then the group of players of our 
Land, those who play upon instruments of 
string and instruments of wind did tickle 
our ears with pleasant sounds and cause 
us to marvel. 

10. And those that were soon to depart 
from the Land made themselves busy with 
landing their ten thousand dollar jobs. 

n. And it came to pass that two did 
wage a battle with bayonets in the place 
of many things, known as the Hall of Dis- 
play, even in the presence of the noble 
Arthur; and the Great Smith was made 
humble by one Claudius, surnamed Middle- 
ton. 

12. And some did go about with mis- 
chief in their eye and a veil in hand which 
they did cause to enfold Diana and the 
Mistress of Art did exclaim with horror 
when she beheld the sight and right quick- 
ly she did cry for help to unveil the lady. 



iiiiiiii iiiiiiii 



And it Was in March 

1. Then Players numbering four from 
the Company of Players belonging to this 
Land, did please us greatly and cause much 
wonder and merriment with the play of 
The Mollusc. 

2. And in the place of meeting did 
heralds appear and cry forth the coming 
of the Teller of Tales of the Alabaster 
Princess. And on that evening did we 
cease from our labors and gladly come. 

3. And those who had gone to the 
Windy City and sought to know the plight 
of the poor and downtrodden did speak 
unto us concerning things they had seen. 

4. And lo ! The sky was cast o'er with 
clouds and it did rain cats and dogs. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-SIX 



9 

A? 



ft 



mm^M. 



5 



5. And the river and the lake of the 
Land were filled to overflowing so that 
none might know them. And much water 
stood about for days. 

6. Until the sun did appear and dried 
the earth. Then buds did spring forth and 
the sun shone and all looked for the first 
robin. 

7. And our warriors did become big 
headed and think to show off and behold! 
They were made humble at the hands of 
Aurora. 

8. Then o'er the Land once more is 
there loud wailing and the foolish ones did 
weep because they had studied not. 

9. And through a second day did the 
loud wailing continue. 

10. And shurr are we for wearing a bit 
of green on St. Pat's Day. 

11. And Seniors did wisely remark that 
Juniors need not wear green for that was 
their natural color. 

12. And to our Land came one who 



could speak with wisdom concerning the 
good work of those in Y. W. C. A. 

13. And it was noised abroad over the 
Land that he of the saying absolutely not 
had grown weary of the lonesome life and 
was enthralled with a fair one down state. 
Exactly so! 

14. Then the roasters of meats, the 
mixers of spices did prepare for the Heroes 
of the Land, a sumptuous feast of choice 
victuals and after partaking of them there 
was much toasting and merrie-making. 

15. And then for seven days the land 
was without the chattering maidens and 
boastful lads for spring, and the week of 
freedom from labor was at hand. 

16. And on the last day of the month 
people from the town and from afar did 
gather together with the Wise Ones and 
Simple Ones of the Land meetings did hold 
concerning things in the life of a commun- 
ity and many did speak much wisdom unto 
them, as — "Go not dressed like a peeled 
banana." 



Ear Muffs 

Sing a song of ear muffs, 

Combed o'er every pretty ear; 
What's the use of those things ? 

Why don't you know, my dear? 
They make us look so pretty, 

They serve for several duties — 
They make a very nice garage 

For all our darling cooties. 

Edith Boyd. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-SEVEN 



« I 



m 



«te=4 



A Midnight Minstrel 

It is dark. 

Darkness and silence reign, 
The hour is steeped in dread. 
Where by day calm prevailed 
Now shapes of horror tread. 
Burdens and perplexities 
To giant size have grown. 
The courage that upheld the day 
To other realms had flown, 
The heavy heart is longing, 
The camradship of day 
And God is far away. 

But hark! 

All the air is pregnant with a voice. 

A minstrel from the tree-top 

Bids all the world rejoice; 

A brother and a friend to man, 

He carols on the breeze; 

The mocking bird is wide awake, 

Let dread and horror cease. 

He sings to every need, 

His throat is tuned to hearts of men, 

He's a comrade calling courage back 

And God is near, indeed! 

Mary E. Fuller. 

Class of 1904. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-EIGHT 



9 

A, 



Sz 



MiJfel 



fi 




CH€ eafscain can. 



The curtain fell to end the play — 
But 'fore the guests had gone away 
The curtain once again arose, 
The fetes of May time to disclose. 

And then were seen upon the stage — 
The spring athletes who battle wage. 
The circus folk, the dancers gay, 
And plans for graduation day. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-NINE 



It 



yk 



tCt> 



Iff 




The Circus 



The world famous animals, the "Blunkus," man-eating monster; "Katie," 
the mile long snake, and "Liz" the zephlin, gigantic caterpillar, countless 
trucks and wagons fiVed with gay and hilarious circus folk rattled along in 
line; a band crashed out wild music; colorful bouncing clowns jumped here 
and there; cheers, hoarse cries, undistinguishable shouting — one great 
deafening din punctuated by riots of color and our famous, world-wide 
known freaks — this was our parade. 

Then the circus! Cries of "Peanuts, peanuts" — "Right this way to the 
Big Show" — "Ex-try Paper!" deafened your ears. Excited children, anx- 
ious mothers, amused fathers, hilarious students, unbending faculty all 
merged into one big "circus crowd." They threw nickles and dimes reck- 
lessly away on peanuts and ice cream cones and they started to follow the 
different shows. It was mostly an affair of "Upstairs and Down," for it 
was up to the Auditorium to see "A Parliament of Servants," then down 
to the gym to see the basketball girls' stunt, then up again to see "Frank 
Glynn's Wife," down again to the Main Show where you caught your 
breath and watched different clubs and students perform, as advertised, 
side splitting, mirth provoking stunts, each more excellent than the last. 
Then up again to see "Taps," and down again to go home — home to talk 
over that wonderful time and that glorious unexcelled circus of our Nor- 
mal School. 

Mona M. Bahr. 




PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY 



1 t 



It 



MiJm^ 



9 




PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-ONE 



a= 



A 



I 

1 



« 






WPdl 




May Day 



May Day ! What memories it brings ! The gay time 
we had that day: the May Queen on her throne in front 
of the magnolia tree; the sweet gay music that sounded 
through the air; the girls dancing on the soft green grass, 
winding the May Pole. Then, too, the dance at Williston 
Hall ; the living room transformed into a tropical palm grove, 
the girls in their pretty gowns, making a rainbow of many 
delicate shades. Shall we ever forget that May Day ! 

Dorothy Reichelt. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-TWO 



It 



o 

A 9 



Mi.«ML 



JB 




Fresh green a-growing 

Everywhere you pass; 
Fragrant flowers a-blowing 

In the soft, sweet grass; 
Budding ivy clinging, 
Birds so gladly singing, 

In our land. 

Soft clouds a-sailing 

Up amid the blue ; 
Breezes gently swaying 

Blooms of every hue. 
Rosy mists a-shimmering, 
Lake with gold a-glimmering, 

In our land. 

Hildur Flodin. 



^■KVU^Bi^ A . -: X~MLWk . . « 


fll»i" 


-jg\jjs^7 s \. 










ftffidl£*9^B9SE*^^/T\^&^' 


ii^H&fcy? 




< 




1 


fliF~^~' W8^~lt££9m&R 


LK^Vm .**m?fejiB^! 










1 


^■fiBfe^H| 


bHbK' ^'Kv Bv U^^£ •■- , 


^v^^^S 


1 - 






LA 




K^y|^l^|<?'\ 


»wi--, •,-"'',,' "#5p 






1 u J 


if/ 1 / 


m ' '" i^fc ■ 


I ■■* — c ML . , Sivftw j ri 


JR 








■far;. '*//", >t^B 


W/^r^R.k ?& «i 'fl-'u ". f s 










f~rr'- Ar • ^>tt ' 






■»*$ 




$ 


mt?9I 




^ '"ffiBfrfrf'fr*"' 1 ' ■« 


^^r 


i? !WWK - r ™*W™,-ii^.:- iX ■ 


■*" 


■.«: ■ - 


■ ■■■ ■ - :, ' ; ' ; 


$ wJBSJMtQ&i ■■;:■ il 












' 


V M& ' 


^ \ ii'trr 


•sr 


■ 


■wiiilWfff I 


Mi 


^ .■ fi J^*"^L 


H^ 




1 


I ; 


,1 U L 












nbti 


• . 4 





PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-THREE 



9 
A, 



&mSMp4 



According to the Month of April 



i. And on this day, being the first day 
of the month and the month of April, 
many did tell foolish things concerning our 
hair, or what not, until they could beguile 
the guileless and say April Fool. 

2. And the lads of the Confreres did 
summon us to do rythms with the feet in 
the foyer after the labor of the day was 
over. And a jolly good time we did have, 
with gay musick. 

3. On this eventide for the last time 
our Brave Battling Warriors did gain a 
hard victory with good sportsmanship and 
clean playing, from those who played for 
the Legion. 

4. Milady did think to dress so finely 
on this day, Easter Day, but the ruler of 
weather did think not so, and spring flow- 
ers did remain in band boxes. 

5. And in the period of assembly one 
who knew the way of foreign folk did pleas- 
antly relate the tale of Kalavala and she 
did clothe herself in gay garment of Fin- 
land. 

6. And it came to pass that Smith of 
the Big Words, stood before the gathered 
multitude and spake unto them; for it was 
in the minds of some to cause a circus to 
be held in the Land which meaneth the 
planning of stunts and the capture of wild 
animals. 

7. And scribes of the chronicle of the 
year, the Book called the Norther, did 
sigh deeply and their countenances did 
show great relief, for was not the day of 
reckoning the day set aside by the printer 
at hand? 

8. And again players did enter our 
Land, even from the Land of Norway, and 
for one eventide after another they did 



appear before us and all were as struck 
dumb with the words and deeds of Hedda 
Gabler and did marvel and wonder at The 
Master Builder. 

0. And the Big Man did cause to be put 
upon the Place of Announcements, small 
cards of one size and neatness, whereon 
all must write their commands and make 
known their wants. 

10. And it was rumored abroad over the 
Land that at the place for the wherewithal 
to stay the pangs of hunger, some of the 
Wise Ones did show themselves eager, even 
as the simple folk, to learn the mysteries 
of their horoscope. 

n. Then before us stood one of the 
Y. W. C. A., a maid of our own Land and 
with much wisdom and a sweet way, she 
did relate the woes of China and the ways 
of the students of that Land. 

12. And among the trible of Seniors 
there was much discussion concerning the 
apparel to be worn on the Great Day of 
the receiving of the Sheepskin, as to whe- 
ther it should be caps and gowns or the 
simple frock of the, sweet graduate. 

13. And the maids did converse hold 
concerning the color of the kerchief and 
the apparel of the feet. 

14. And again, another lass stood before 
us and did relate with wisdom and thought- 
ful study the way of the women of Japan. 

15. Rejoice in Baseball! Oh! Ye that 
are full of pep! The warriors of the Bat 
and Ball do labor on the field and soon we 
may join in cheers and shouts of triumph 
over victories that they win. And on this 
day there was much doing in the place of 
weekly meeting and we did sit and listen 
for one hour. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-FOUR 



tt 



terns 



i 

orXhe 



9 

A, 



5 



As it Happened in May and June 



i. And now, dear reader, as prophets 
foretold in days of old even so must the 
humble chronicler now foretell the passing 
of events that have not yet happened. 

2. And excitement was over the whole 
Land and before the great event, riders 
with their steeds did come and wild ani- 
mals, even the Blunkus, and the serpent 
Boa Constrictor and the Band did loudly 
peal forth gay musick and all did wend 
their way down the broad streets of the 
village; and the villagers did gather and 
gaze on the flashing colors and hearken to 
the lively musick. 

3. In the eventide, a multitude gathered 
and did witness the stunts; and all did en- 
joy the Jocyln dance and the Highland 
Fling and young and old did look on the 
Pearly Gates with great interest and cur- 
iosity. 

4. And there had been much labor on 
the part of the players of the Land, for 
were they not to entertain the Land one 
eventide with "Joint Owners in Spain," 
"Overtones" and "Indian Summer"? 

5. And we were addressed by a Junior 
maid, who told us concerning Korean and 
the folk who dwell therein and we mar- 
veled, "How doth she know?" 

6. And the songsters of the Treble Clef 
did sing songs and melodies of diverse 
lands and some players did play and right 
gladly, for a second eventide were they to 
pass in dancing and merrie-making. 

7. Now it came to pass that the time 
of May was celebrated by the maidens of 
the Hall, who did hold high Festival and did 



dance and sing about the Maypole. And 
in the eventide youths came also, and all 
did partake of the feasting and dancing 
that was there. 

8. Then at the command of their King 
the Juniors did hold council at different 
appointed times and places, and did make 
great preparations for their prom. 

a. And during this month of the year 
students of society seeking wisdom, did 
journey with the man who hath a beam in 
his eye, to the Windy City to learn of the 
folk there. 

10. And plans and preparations were 
made by the Seniors for their prom and 
some did make flowers and streamers of 
paper and some did select the musick, but 
all did look forward with delight to the 
great time. 

11. As others who departed from the 
Land had done, so did this class also. 
That memory of them might remain, they 
did gather and devise plans concerning 
their high festivities for Clasi Day. 

12. And the play of the Seniors was 
chosen with much consideration and the 
players of the play were chosen also, and 
they did set themselves right diligently to 
the task of committing their lines. 

13. Here have ye read of the doings 
of the Land, of the labors and plays and 
the way of the people and herein should 
be writ more but the time for the printer 
has come; and if it be that much has been 
left out, that should have been recorded, 
will ye supply it according to your own 
satisfactions? Thus saveth the Chronicler. 



May 20. EXTRA. The baseball season is in full swing. Since the 
opening game against Mt. Morris on Glidden Field, the N. I. S. N. S. team 
has defeated Wheaton College at DeKalb, 10-3, and Mt. Morris at Mt. 
Morris, 10-5. Root is pitching a very steady game and the team is batting 
and fielding excellently. Looks like a great season. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-FIVE 



IE 



M*te=4 



a 



DeKalb Normal Joins Conference With 
Minor Colleges of Illinois 

On April nineteenth a meeting was held at Peoria, Illinois, in which the 
Northern Illinois State Normal joined the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic 
Conference. Mr. R. G. Buzzard represented N. I. S. N. S. at the meeting. 
The following eighteen institutions will make up the association. They 
are: Lombard, Illinois State Normal, St. Viator's, Augustana, Milikin, 
Illinois Wesleyan, Illinois College, Carthage, Charleston Normal, Eureka, 
Northwestern College, Monmouth, Knox, Hedding, Lincoln, Macomb Nor- 
mal and DeKalb Normal. 

The conference membership is limited to institutions that have four-year 
courses leading to a bachelor's degree or that can meet the requirements of 
the Illinois Federation of Colleges. The Faculty of these institutions will 
comprise the officers and will have voting power. The officers elected are 
President, Fred L. Muhl, athletic director Illinois Wesleyan; Vice Presi- 
dent, N. G. Wann, athletic director of James Milikin University, Decatur; 
Secretary, H. H. Russel, athletic director Illinois State Normal University, 
Normal ; Treasurer, Prof . Schilling, Monmouth at Monmouth. It was de- 
cided that as soon as the eighteen schools approved of the constitution and 
by-laws that the new organization would go into effect. An important 
feature of this conference is that the championship of each season's events 
will be based upon a percentage basis. 




PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-SIX 



1 1 , • 

X 9 I 



t *m$&=$- 



Normal, 19; Mt. Morris, 10 

On May first the Normal nine played their first base ball game of the 
season with Mt. Morris College. The Mt. Morris representatives were de- 
termined to get even for the two defeats they received during the basketball 
season. During the first inning neither side scored, although Normal had 
several men on bases. In the second inning Normal began hitting the ball 
right and left and continued doing so the rest of the game. Mt. Morris 
scored through errors made by the Normal players, but nevertheless it 
was a good practice game. The score was : 

Normal— AB R PO A E 

Garner, 1st. B 5 1 12 

Best, 3rd B 5 2 2 2 3 

Winterhalter. SS 5 2 12 

Cannon, 2nd B 5 4 3 2 

Hampson, C 5 3 2 

Root, P 5 1 2 4 

Bristow, L. F 4 3 2 

King, C. F 4 110 

Dadds, R. F 4 10 

Two base hits — Garner, Winterhalter, Hampson; stolen bases 
— Best, 2, King, Winterhalter. 

Mt. Morris— AB R PO A E 

Young, R. F 4 

Bechtold, 1st B 4 1 6 2 

Allen, H., C. F 4 12 10 

Sharer, SS 4 2 4 1 

Michael, C 4 2 7 2 1 

Van Dyke, 3rd B 4 2 4 4 

Miller, 2nd B 4 2 5 3 1 

Lahman, L. F 4 1 2 

Fahrney , P 3 1 

Thompson 3 

Two base hits — Michael, Sharer. 

BASEBALL SCHEDULE OF NORTHERN NORMAL 
Saturday, May 1. Mt. Morris at DeKalb. 
Saturday, May 8. Wheaton College at DeKalb. 
Wednesday, May 12. Aurora College at DeKalb. 
Saturday, May 15. Mt. Morris College at Mt. Morris. 
Wednesday, May 19. St. Albans School at Sycamore. 
Friday, May 21. St. Albans School at DeKalb. 

Saturday, May 22. Illinois Inter-collegiate Track and Field Meet, Peoria. 
Wednesday, May 26. Joliet Junior College at Joliet. 
Saturday, May 29. Joliet Junior College at DeKalb. 
Saturday, June 5. Aurora College at Aurora. 
Saturday, June 12. Lewis Institute at DeKalb. 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-SEVEN 



Lit A*, i 



MSto4 



Imtpses (3lnt0 junior pieek 



of t^e 

^fariljmt (SlUmois jiiate formal jidjool 

JePalb, ^lllmots 

%\\t formal jicijtfol ^gnarfr 

tl|e ^Jresthent arta Jfaculig, ana ilje junior Class 

corbtallg mfcttg gnu io be present 

3Juni> ttje tfytrtgentij la ilje scfotttecntij 

nineteen tjnnhrec tfaenig 

jientur ^Banquet 

SATURDAY EVENING. JUNE THE TWELFTH 
AT SIX O'CLOCK. BY THE 
SENIOR CLASS IN HONOR OF THEIR PRESIDENT 
DR. BROWN 

^Batcaiattmtte J^erfrtte 

SUNDAY EVENING. JUNE THE THIRTEENTH 

SEVEN-THIRTY O'CLOCK 

ADDRESS BY PRESIDENT J. STANLEY BROWN 

SPECIAL MUSIC 

NORMAL SCHOOL AUDITORIUM 

jlatte Class ^Bag e jEwawe» 

MONDAY. JUNE THE FOURTEENTH 

AT THREE O'CLOCK 

NORMAL SCHOOL CAMPUS 

PAGEANT 
HISTORY OF THE CAMPUS 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-EIGHT 



-i ^Aklf- 



senior CUIass piag 



TUESDAY EVENING. JUNETHE FIFTEENTH 

EIGHT O'CLOCK 

NORMAL SCHOOL AUDITORIUM 

"KINDLING" 

BY CHARLES KENYON 

CAST 

MAGGIE SCHULTZ . MARION DAVIS 

HEINRICH SCHULTZ WILLARD SMITH 

MRS. BATES WINNIFRED MALEY 

STEVE BATES . FRANK DADDS 

MRS. BURKE SMITH NORA TULLY 

ALICE . . . CECILIA CHEWNING 

RAFFERTY . . RUSSELL SMITH 

MR. HOLLAND . ROY FOWLER 

DONOVAN - CLAUDE MIDDLETON 

DR. TAYLOR - - - JOHN GARNER 



^@tspla|j oi departments 

MANUAL ARTS 

HOUSEHOLD ARTS-MILLINERY. DRESS MAKING 

DRAWING 

MUSIC 

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON. JUNE THE SIXTEENTH 

THREE-THIRTY O'CLOCK 

NORMAL SCHOOL AUDITORIUM 



Presidents JlReceptton anfr JVlnmm •Sinner 

WEDNESDAY EVENING. JUNE THE SIXTEENTH 
EIGHT O'CLOCK 
WILLISTON HALL 

Commencement ^Exercises 

ADDRESS BY THE HONORABLE WILLIAM MATHER LEWIS 

DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

presentation of ^tplomas 

SPEECH BY MEMBER OF SENIOR CLASS 

ELLEN LUHTALA 

THURSDAY MORNING. JUNE THE SEVENTEENTH 

NINE-THIRTY O'CLOCK 

NORMAL SCHOOL AUDITORIUM 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-NINE 



ft 



1 I 



Milfe! 



iff 




PAGE ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY 



Northern 

Illinois State Normal 

School 



The call for teachers is very great. Salaries for Normal 
School graduates are steadily increasing. No graduate of this 
school need start at less than $1,000 per year. In the special 
departments, salaries even run much higher. The demand is 
far in excess of the supply. 

There is a place in this school for those who desire to pursue 
courses in regular Normal work, Household Economics, Music, 
Art, and Manual Training. 

Last year the Manual Training graduates were placed at 
from $1,400 to 1,800 per year. Considerably more than one 
hundred calls came for Manual Training teachers which the 
school was unable to supply. 

The Manual Training Department offers courses which give 
its graduates junior standing in university and at the same 
time prepare them for good positions as teachers of Manual 
Training. 



For full information, address 

The Northern Illinois State Normal School 

DR. J. STANLEY BROWN, President 
DeKalb, Illinois 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY-THREE 



SELF MASTERS 



The only way to get along with 
yourself agreeably is to be the Master 
of Yourself. 

Self Masters are contented, happy, 
forceful and independent. 

Those that are slaves to themselves 
are always miserable. 

Thrift is a habit of Self Masters. 
It means mastering yourself a little 
every day. 

Be a Self Master and take some 
portion of your earnings whenever 
they come to you and put them in 
the bank. 



The First National Bank 
The First Trust &. Savings Bank 

DeKalb, Illinois 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY-FOUR 



OHO f!P£ CH6Y ? 















SEE US FOR 

Shoes, Oxfords, Pumps, Rubbers and 
Shoe Repairing 

CEDEROTH'S EAST END SHOE STORE 

Telephone 98 
630 East Lincoln Highway DeKalb, Illinois 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED EIGHTYVFIVE 



EAT AT THE 

Bell Restaurant 

CARLSON &. HALIKIAS 
Proprietors 



Always Open 



323 East Lincoln Highway 
DeKalb, Illinois 



Only the Juniors 

Bang! Crash! Clatter! Ghumpety thump! As I studiously sat working 

at my table, vainly tiying to add X + l and Y — suddenly there came 

to me the sound as of thousands of feet running down stairs, accompanied 

by the shouting of as many voices. The noise grew louder and louder. 

"And the mumbling grew to a rumbling, 

And down the stairs the girls came tumbling." 

As the noise continued, I became rather excited and hundreds of sug- 
gestions came to my mind as to what might have happened. "Had one 
of the radiators sprung a leak and was threatening to flood the whole 
building? Maybe Miss Thompson had eloped. Was the Normal building 
on fire? Had the United States entered the League of Nations? Perhaps 
the school was going to be closed on account of the shortage of coal. 

As I reached this final conclusion, I hastily jumped up and ran to the 
door, determining to find out for sure what was causing all of the excite- 
ment and confusion. Upon opening the door, in my haste, I nearly 
collided with a Senior who was coming to pay me a social call. As she 
saw my look of inquiry and consternation, she immediately quieted all of 
my fears by the rather sarcastic remark: "Don't get excited. It's only 
— the Juniors." 

Annette Carlson. 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY-SIX 



HILAND 
BROTHERS 



Painters and 
Decorators 



ft? 



Signs Wall Paper Paints 
Oils Glass 



Carl W* Moore 

229-231 South First Street 

Groceries, Meats and 
Vegetables 

BEST QUALITY GOODS 



Sprague, Warner & Co., 
Franklin MacVeagh & Co., 
Durand & Casper Co.'s 
Groceries. 

Armour & Co.'s 
Meats. 



The New Reference Sheet 



Hour Reciting 
All of the time 



Student's name Per Cent 
Silly Titter 99 

Teacher's name 
Sally B. Cross 

Q. What is the exact title of 
the "Merry Tee Hees ?" 

A. "The Giggling Rusty-jo-bell-Sher- 
man Tee Hees." 

Q. How are the most impor- 
tant entries separated from the 
least important ? 

A. Those who giggle some of the 
time have more credits than those who 
le all of the time. 



Q. Tell whether to look at 
the front or the back of the 
book, or where to find the fol- 
lowing : 

Dr. Brown's Graceful Dis- 
missals. 
Peck's Studio. 

Miss Patten, any week end. 
Chicago 

History of English language. 

Russell Smith 

Happily Married. 
Mr. Buzzard 

Q. What does "69" marked 
opposite a pupil's name mean? 

A. The pupil has still another term 
to giggle in the same class. 

Q. What is the original 
meaning of the phrase "no- 
body home?" 

A. It is probably from the verse: 
"You beat your pate, and fancy wit 
will come; 
Knock as you please, there's nobody at 
home." 

Ruth Johnson. 



PAGE ONE EIGHTY-SEVEN 



UNGER'S 

BUSTER BROWN SHOE STORE 
High Class Footwear 



SHOES REPAIRED 



1 34 East Lincoln Highway 



The Gullickson 
Studio 



O O 

Every 
Day 



You're Growing Older and Years 
Are Unkind to Beauty 



Let Us Photograph 
You Now 



*>.: 



% 




We Carry a Complete Assortment of 
Lumber, Building Material, Fuel. 
Prompt Service and Fair Dealing. 



w 



Mo s her & Embree 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY-EIGHT 



1Q21 





_LHE graduate of today enters a 
world electrical. 

Gathered from the distant waterfalls 
or generated by the steam turbine, 
electric power is transmitted to 
the busiest city or the smallest 
country place. 

Through the co-ordination of inventive genius 
with engineering and manufacturing resources, 
the General Electric Company has fostered and 
developed to a high state of perfection these 
and numerous other applications. 
And so electricity, scarcely olderthan the grad- 
uate of today, appears in a practical, well de- 
veloped service on every hand. 
Recognize its power, study its applications to 
your life's work, and utilize it to the utmost 
for the benefit of all mankind. 



General Office 
Schenectady; N.Y 



Sales Offices in 

all large cities 96-246P 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY-NINE 



There's Pleasure for 
YOU in 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

THE KIND THAT PLEASE 



Come look at our work. Then try us with 
an order — you'll become a steady customer. 



NATUSCH 

THE Photographer in YOUR Town 



I Wooden 

Vtfbat the 
Vem^ of 

toiler 

Thinks about 



I 



Well l'\>e been 
rr>o\>ed to the 
Assembly ball. 
Oovi) I can see 
General ^Ex 




That one-armed 
lady bad me movted 
to this Side, but 

lean see just as 
well- 




Tbose Students 
came in like a 
lot o/jell^yiah! 
The^ made bash 
out o£_jtbat Sond 




Those class meet- 
ino" announce- 
ments and. 1?. Smith 
are asdj2>c95the 
Sabard- 




Tbe onl^) excite- 
ment I batfe seen 
vOas that League 
o/ Nations debate. 

I Uudbed so bard 
>^ that I 




cracked a be ice 
o/ plaster 1 /r'om 
m$ cheek, but it 
looks LiKeadimble 
5o | should vPonr^ 




He is dismissing 
them oovO.Tbe vGaj) 
be balances bim- 
Sel/ oo one /bo"t is 

dood^ but hoshaje 
^^ncthjnyl 

x ' ' Inline 



is 




PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINETY 




Peach Sour. — Pick out a peach. Invite her to a Normal 
hop. Call her up the night of the performance and tell her 
you cannot take her. The result will be a peach sour. 

Scrambled Brains. — Take one psychology student, stuff with 
notes, garnish with outlines, season with exams, and thicken 
with flunks. If the result is unsatisfactory, repeat, doub- 
ling the quantities. If this does not produce scrambled brain, 
try no further for your subject is brainless. 

Gladys Miners. 



QUALITY 



PRODUCTS 



B, A, RAILTON COMPANY 

WHOLESALE 
GROCERS 

CATERING TO DORMITORIES, HOSPITALS 
INSTITUTIONS 

373-405 WEST ERIE STREET 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



COFFEE ROASTERS 

IMPORTERS 

MANUFACTURERS 



TELEPHONE, SUPERIOR 7970 

PRIVATE EXCHANGE 

ALL DEP'TS 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINETY-ONE 



Unpaid Bills— Submitted by the Student 
Teachers 

Children found chewing gum 12 

Children found eating apples 3 

Number of children who fell off their chairs 6 

Arbitrated children's quarrels 4 times 

Dried children's tears 5 times 

Children caught shooting paper wads 9 

Number of times I told my name 24 times 

Children asked to wash their hands 6 

Number of children who asked to pass paste, 

scissors, paper, etc 37 

Number of children who wanted to erase the boards. .16 

Tied children's shoes 7 times 

Children caught throwing paper out of the windows 4 
Number of children who were asked to remain after 

school 5 

The High Cost of Living has not been reduced. 

Ruth Johnson. 



M* F* Malone & Company 

THE STORE OF BEST VALUES 



Dry Goods Shoes Ready-to- Wear 

DE KALB'S NEWEST STOCK 



"Palmer" Garments in Suits, Coats and Dresses, 
"Dellman" Waists and Blouses, Kayser Gloves, 
"Merode" Underwear, Black Cat Hosiery, P. 
N. and R. &- G. Corsets, "Irving Drew" and 
"Grover" Shoes. 



230 East Lincoln Highway DeKalb, Illinois 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINETY-TWO 



FRANK BURKE ... S. A. CHARLES 

BURKE & CHARLES 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

PEERLESS ICE 
CREAM 

SPECIAL PRICES TO CHURCH PICNICS AND SOCIALS 
TELEPHONE 388 520 GIRARD STREET, DE KALB 

PRINCESS 

PLAYHOUSE 

THE THEATRE PRESENTING THE PICK 
OF THE PHOTOPLAYS 



ACCOMPANIED BY MUSICIANS WHO KNOW JUST 
HOW TO PLAY PICTURES 



WE ADVERTISE THE BEST 

BECAUSE WE HAVE THE BEST 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINETY-THREE 



9 

A? 



It 



MSM^ 



* 



Some of Them? 




JE3 






■ d a.;,».» 



First of all, 

Is the Big Man 

At the head 

Of this institution. 

They'll know Dr. Brown 

By his tall stature 

And other proportions 

Similarly agreeing. 

But if he smiles 

And jokes with them, 

Please remember 

He does the same 

With everyone. 

Dean Gilbert, too, 

Will win their hearts 

By his kind face 

And twinkling eyes. 

Mr. Phipps 

Will surely show his dialect. 

"Conductahs", "insulatahs" 

"Cawhon," "watah." 

Mr. Page 

Makes you watch 

Your step carefully 

For fear of harming 

Some of his 

Historical junk. 

Miss Merritt signs our excuses 

Approved or maybe disapproved, 

And declares 

"What a fine morning!" 

Miss Broemel 

Will try to ruin 

Your piece of art 

With scratches here 

And scratches there. 

Miss Foster 

Will preach to you 

About self organization, 

And teach you to climb 

A pole 

Like a circus girl. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINETY-FOUR 



There's a road leading back to Normal, 

Leading back to those ivied towers, 

And although far away 

In thought oft we'll stray, 

O'er that road to this school of ours. 

Pearl Murray. 



C*W* Garner 

Ferndell Goods 
Teas and 
Coffees. 

Groceries, Drugs, 
Medicines. 



Buffalo Candy 
Kitchen 



E-A-C-O FLOUR 



Corner of Lincoln Highway 
and Second St.— 'Phone 238 



Dainty Lunches 
Fine Candies 




PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINETY-FIVE 




THE 

FLOWER 

STORE 



J. L. JOHNSON 

Proprietor 



311 EAST LINCOLN 
HIGHWAY 



Phone 
628 




Peter, Peter, pumpkin-eater; 
Had a wife, and couldn't keep her. 
Till someone told him to feed her on bread, 
"Be sure you get Sally Ann," they said. 
So Peter forthwith took their advice, 
And now his wife is extremely nice. 
Sally Ann bread will help anyone's 
Frame of mind. Try it 

HOLLAND €T 
GOODYEAR 



•••••o^ #### ' 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINETY-SIX 



When Books Are 
Forgotten 

The last class is over, 'tis Friday night, 
I take my books and my heart is light, 
I bring them all home and throw them 

down, 
My old text books, green, red and brown. 
No science notebooks to write in all 

night, 
No troublesome French to translate just 

right. 
There may be a game of basket ball, 
And then a dance at Williston Hall; 
Or we'll to the movies to see the show, 
And after to Lincoln Inn blithely go. 
Then back to the Hall, but not to bed. 
Oh no! "Ten-thirty's the time for a 

spread." 
Laughter and music ring through the 

Hall. 
"School books, you are forgotten by all." 
Alta Anfinsen. 



POWELL'S 

DRUG 
STORE 



6 



Corner Sixth 
and Lincoln 
Highway 



Phones 85 
and 65 



"In Room 302" 

I went down the hall at eight o'clock 
To quiet the screeches of a noisy flock, 
I knocked on the door — not a sound 

from within, 
So I opened it gently and looked there- 
in. 
An unheard of creature was under the 

bed, 
For I saw three feet but nary a head, 
A bathrobe cord and a red felt slipper 
Betrayed a girl that was quite a skipper. 
An overturned pie and a broken platter 
Revealed to me the cause of the clatter, 
So I shut the door and slipped away 
Hoping for silence 'till the break of day. 



The Long, Long Line 

There's a long, long line a-forming 

through the halls and sewing room 
Where the tables are all empty till the 

luncheon meets its doom. 
There's a long, long time of waiting, 

with the good smells in the air 
Till we reach that open doorway with 

the menu fluttering there. 
Soon the hungry line is winding past 

the pans of meat and stew, 
Where the salads are all taken, and 

desserts are left but few. 
With loaded trays they're moving slow- 
ly to the dining room, 
Where midst laughter, talk and chatter, 

the dishes empty soon. 
Then each piles his own dishes, from 

wee ones to faculty, 
And all praise the toothsome cooking 

of the Normal's H. A. C. 

Gyla May Butler. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINETY-SEVEN 



B. C. Knodle | [ Wennlund's 

| "Candy 



Hardware 



Shop" 



Columbia 
Grafonolas 
and Records 

Fine 
Cutiery 



LIGHT 

HEAT 

POWER 



■ ••ItllMlfl'OMIIMI 



DeKalt> 
Sycamore 
Electric 
Company 



Soft Drinks 

Candy 

Tobaccos 



'Service DeLuxe' 



Conlin's 
Elevators 



Hay 

Grain 

Feed 

Coal 

Flour 



DeKalb 
Cortland 
Maple Park 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINETY-EIGHT 



Hours: 1-4 and 7-9 p. m. 

Sundays 10-12 a. m. 

James S. Rankin 

Physician 

and Surgeon 

Telephone 207 149 Lincoln Highway 
DeKalb, Illinois 



Clifford E. Smith, M. D. 

Practice limited to diseases of the Eye, 
Ear, Nose and Throat. Glasses scien- 
tifically fitted. Office, corner Lincoln 
Highway and Third Street in Haish 
Opera House Block. 

Telephone 734-1 
Hours: 9:00-11:00 a. m.; 2:00-500 p. m.; 



Sundays 9:00-11:00 a. m. 

evenings 7:00-8:00 

Residence 314 Augusta Avenue 



Wednesday and Saturday 
Telephone 734-2 



Drs. Brown & Brown 

Physicians 
and Surgeons 

O. J. Brown, M. D., hours 8-9 a. m., 1-2 

and 7-9 p. m. 
Mareva D. Brown, M. D., hours 10-12 

a. m. and 2-4 p. m. 
Office and residence, Wagner Building, 
opposite First National Bank. Phone 51 



Dr. John H. Riley 

DeKalb, Illinois 

Stoddard L. Anderson 

Physician 
and Surgeon 

Office — 157 East Lincoln Highway 

Phone 277-1 

Residence — 311 South Fourth Street 

Telephone 277-2 

Office hours: 1-4 and 7-8 p. m. 

Sundays 11 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

H. G. and R. A. Wright 

Homeopathic 
Physicians and Surgeons 

DeKalb Office: Wright Building 
153 North Third Street 

Hours: 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 
Telephone: Office 34 
Residences 254 and 180 



—THE riON-ES5EnTlflL STUDEN 




brrOva* KJLs q'Urt. 
o± vo.-3 5P.fi. ' 



T~He chftop 
6H.dfce. nnKo 
V*ts " Ke-t- 'oot^Ljj 
t»tHe. Cf<M?v«. — J 

oXcrTve.'Johe oajx. 

gave tu/»-blfc5. 




<\ V**» u — 
'oaJrtfr fo&ep ttfne. 




to bouU., cuxA 
'HP'-' 




Me3,qoo.( 

The CloUuSC. 



page one hundred ninety-nine 



The Apple Blossoms 

What could be more lovely than 
these sweet blossoms! Perhaps we 
walk briskly out to Annie's Woods to 
see them in the early morning. And 
there they are — the dew sparkling on 
them as if fairies too had appreciated 
their beauty and had touched each vel- 
vet petal with their wands. Now and 
then the solitude is broken by a burst 
of song as a blue bird or bright tanager 
selects these lovely branches as a suit- 
able place from which to serenade the 
golden ball in the east. And then to- 
ward evening as the merry picnickers 
come to s enjoy an hour or more, we 
find our fragrant blossoms just as love- 
ly as they were in the morning. The 
bent, twisted trees are there ever ready 
to blow you their perfumed messages of 
love and gladness in the form of these 
tiny pink tokens. 

C. Chewning. 




KIRCHNER'S 
DRUG STORE 

"THE REXALL STORE" 

Dependable 
Druggists 



Everything in the 
Drug Line 



Prescriptions 
Our Specialty 



Mrs. Gus 
Kirchner 



llllllll llllllll 



Shampooing 
Hair Dressing 
Face Massage 



^^n pii)i |j 



HAIR GOODS 
FOR SALE 



l'AGli TWO HUNDRED 



r 



*\ 




The New 
Styles 

in Oxfords 
and Pumps 
for 1920 



"V\7"7*E have just placed in our 

W windows a very elaborate 

display of the latest styles of women's 

Oxfords and 
Pumps 

\^hen we say "latest" we mean 
styles that are different from those 
ordinarily seen — styles that possess 
unusual individuality and are in har- 
mony with today's fashions. 

Blomquist Bros. 

DeKalb, Illinois 



V: 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED ONE 



J 



Why go so far looking for a Drug Store when the Crescent, 
your nearest store, can supply all your wants in School Books, Sta- 
tionery, School Supplies, Crane's Highland Linen in boxes, by the 
pound, or tablets. We carry a full assortment of the best Toilet 
Articles, including Hudnut's, Armand, Puritan Beauty and many 
others. 

CAMERAS — We handle the Rexo Cameras, all sizes, none bet- 
ter. Our films are guaranteed. Bring them to us to be developed 
and printed. 

Bring your prescription to us to be filled. 

The only place to get the genuine Allen's New York Ice Cream. 

Try one of our Sundaes. Our Sodas taste right. Root Beer in 
large mugs. Coca Cola, Green River, Lime and other drinks. 



J. T. DENSON, R. PH. 



PHONE 330 



143 EAST LINCOLN HIGHWAY 



flINT IT R GRAND AND GLPR.I0U5 FEELING ?! 





Ujr\\«\. uouto U«W. 

Veite*- "nrtfrnrv Wrw, 
\w\£h 3&tYve mmvaxj, 





hoarejt^tuTna to vjjtuj:, 
ST> uo<x qtj "to the oWef 
oo\A uxi**h fWluwxjja 
Sorttha ywaiL 




uo-u/'pO-SS vjjp'a. Hit 
tuJ^e. at the. Xv\*y, 







botjjrd \fy dbafc.aicvA 




H-wd. the**. Orvtlv* 
mortvuvQ u&ur frvwwL 



ftruL uouv* k<uL "to - 
to a o to the rurrJi% 




Ct a. q-q-aprtuvd. 
curud. q'lmAlfru* 



i?!!? 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED TWO 



STAR THEATRE 



You are always sure of a good 
program of PICTURES and 
Music at 



Corner Lincoln 
Highway and 
Fourth St. 



"THE STAR" 



Reveries of 

(Apologies to 

Well, here it is Friday night. I 
might have gone into the frat meeting 
tonight, but then I didn't. I could go 
to the movies or to that dance they are 
giving at the Elks, but I guess I will 
just sit in this comfortable old chair and 
think how good I feel about the world 
in general. 

You know it's nice to be a bachelor 
even if you have to be a very respect- 
able bachelor. This life certainly has 
its compensations. Just think of the 
advantages we bachelors have over the 
man of a family who always has some 
one to remind him that the furnace 
needs coal, or how nice it would be 
if he would help with the dishes "just 
this one evening, dear." 

But then, there are some drawbacks 
to a bachelor's life. How nice it would 
have been to have taken the afternoon 
train to Champaign. Her sorority cer- 
tainly maintains a fine parlor. Natural- 
ly! It's her sorority. 

Pshaw! These are strange thoughts 
for a set and eminently respectable 



a Bachelor 

R. G. B.) 

bachelor. It is very difficult to be a 
model of wit, wisdom and propriety for 
such a school as this. Too many girls 
-^that's the trouble. Exactly! But 
things might be worse, for the few 
young men that are here keep me busy 
reminding them that I shall have to col- 
lect rent if they do not refrain from 
using my end of the hall so extensively. 
I suppose I used to do the same sort 
of things when I was young and fool- 
ish. 

Hear the rain! How fortunate that 
I am not in the army and on guard. 
I much prefer an alarm clock with 
breakfast at seven-thirty to reveille at 
six and a hurried turn at mess. But 
then, one has so much responsibility 
here, has to be so correct in manner. 
In teaching I always have my class get 
the meaning. Exactly! It is so much 
better to have one's subject absolutely 
right. Well, I must lay out next week's 
lessons and look them over to get my 
concepts nicely adjusted on all points so 
I guess I'll have to quit dreaming. 
Kenneth Faxon. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED THREE 





Expression is All of Music 

To eliminate sameness; to stress this note, to lightly touch that one; to 
bring out one phrase fortissimo and diminish into daintiest pianissimo in the 
next phrase; to put feelling, expression, individuality into any selection is 
easily accomplished on 

The Apollo 

It is a piano of highest character, distinguished for tonal beauty and responsive action, 
coupled with the famous APOLLO player action. The exclusive spring motor of the 
APOLLO with its patented feature assuring absolute time control, and the transposing 
device which allows one to change the key for word rolls to suit the voice, are two much 
appreciated features of the APOLLO. 

Apollo Piano Co. 

Manufacturers 
DE KALB. ILLINOIS 




iiiiii 




PAGE TWO HUNDRED FOUR 



The DeKalb Daily Chronicle 

A GOOD PAPER IN A GOOD TOWN 




GOOD PRINTING 

Books, Catalogs, Booklets, Circulars, Folders, Stationery, 
Programs, Wedding Invitations, Cards, etc. 



Mind Wanderings in Psychology 

"Let us see now, in this illustration of the baby and the ball, how he 
gets motor control in connecting a visual impression with a movement of 
his hand and arm. (But the class is thinking: What a beauty!) Sup- 
pose a bright colored ball is held before his eyes, like this. (She's wearing 
it every day ! See it sparkle ! ) This stimulus sends sensory currents over 
the optic tracts to the brain centers. (I wish I had one like it.) These 
currents must get out again in the form of movements because every stim- 
ulus must result in a movement. (She was out of school last Friday — he 
must have been in Chicago too.) But there are no pathways over which 
this neural excitement may be effectively discharged so the stimulation 
travels over all of them. (Wonder who he is.) Instead of making one 
single movement, he makes many. (Wonder where he lives.) If the ball 
is moved to and fro some of the random movements in the arms will result 
in the child's hand coming in contact with the ball. (Wonder how much 
it cost.) He will grasp it. He finds, when his hand moves, that the ball 
moves also and vice versa. (And the sparkle moves too.) He is most 
conscious when he grasps it and sees it change. (Wonder when it is com- 
ing off.) If this experience is repeated many times, (Oh, we'll miss her) 
the many movements will tend to drop away (Well, he's lucky) and he will 
respond with the one movement." (The sparkle again.) 

Helen Larson. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED FIVE 



DR. J. T. FAUST 
Chiropractor 

DE KALB, ILLINOIS 

Office — Odd Fellows Building 
phone 103 

Office Hours — 9:30-11:30 a. m., 1:00-5:00 p. 
m., 7:00-8:00 p. m. 

Residence — 803 E. Lincoln Highway 
Phone 102. 



Drs. Spickerman Brothers 
Dentists 

B-B BLOCK 

TELEPHONE 7O3 

Xray Service 

Nitrous Oxide and Oxygen Equipment 




_-U k^ 



Arthur E. Grotewohl 

Dentist 

1 57/4 East Lincoln Highway 
Taylor Block 



Office Telephone 80 
Residence Telephone 365 



Office Phone 149 



Residence Phone 344 



H. Lewis Brooks, M. D. 

Practice Limited to Diseases 

of 

EYE-EAR-NOSE-THROAT 

Glasses Correctly Fitted 

Hours 9:00-11:30, 2:00-5:30 
Wed. & Sat. Evenings, 7:00-8:00 p. m. 

Suite 214, Odd Fellows Bldg. 
323 E. Lincoln Hgwy. DeKalb. III. 




Telephones — Office 509-1; Residence 509-2 

Dr. H. Clay Schreck 
Dr. B. P. Mansfield 

Osteopathic 
Physicians 

136 NORTH THIRD STREET 

Sulphur Steam Baths 
Treatments by Appointment 




EYE GLASSES 

That stay on and relieve 
headache and eye -strain 

H. U. Meyers, Oph. D. 

Over News Stand Phone 

Prices Reasonable 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED SIX 



Chandler's 



ALL THE NEWEST STYLES IN WEARING APPAREL 

ARE HERE 

Silk Dresses, Tub Dresses, Waists, Coats, 
Suits and Skirts 

made by the best designers and moderately priced 



u 



La Camille" and "American Lady" Corsets 

in new models, at $2.50, $3.50 to $7.50 each 



Muslin Underwear, Hosiery, Gloves, Hand- 
kerchiefs, Neckwear 

carefully selected lines in all grades priced very low 



W. J. HOPE 

Life, Fire, Tornado, Automobile, Accident and 
Health Insurance 

Office, Knights of Columbus Building, DeKalb 
Representing Mutual Life Insurance Co. of New York Telephone 150 



Can You Imagine 

Erman Miller — Bashful? 

Gladys Rust — Without her giggle? 

Sidney Bristow — As a dwarf? 

Gretchen Ewald — Going to bed at 9:30? 

Russell Smith — Talking so we could understand him? 

Viola Barton — With black hair? 

Veronica Madden — Not talkative? 

Eskiel Anderson — Professor of Astronomy? 

Mildred Julian — With nothing to do? 

Rose Joslin — Having no dates? 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED SEVEN 



HJIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIMIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIinilHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIU 




NEW SPRING 
HATS... 



— Are blossoming forth and the 
best of them come from this live 
store. We suggest that you step 



in today and see some of the latest 
arrivals in stitched cloth hats. They 
come in practically every color, mak- 
ing possible a perfect match-up with 
your new spring suit. 




COMPANY 




From the Woods 

The bony old oaks bid the sun good-night 
And take up their watch in the quiet twilight. 
An old owl snuggled on one of their limbs 
Stops short his whining to-oo-oo. 
For he hears frosty crunches on the freezing path, 
And the happy voices in the light growing dim 
Sound nearer. But they pass, and soon fade away from him, 
And he trembles late greetings, "Whoo, who-oo, whoo-oo, 
Who-oo are you?" 



HENAUGHAN'S 

Up-to-Date Furniture and Undertaking 

323 East Lincoln Highway, DeKalb 

Telephone 833 and 116 



nilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIII IIIIMIS 

PAGE TWO HUNDRED EIGHT 



The Barb City 
| Grocery 

II ° 

1! Our customers 

patronize our store 
Ii because they are 
il convinced the 
ii merchandise and 
ii service we give 

them are superior 
1! to those offered by 
our competitors. 

jj " The Complete Grocery'" 


What A Teacher Should Be jj 


First of all let me say, a teacher, jj 
i above all things should be one who j; 
! when asked by a pupil to be excused jj 
to catch the 2:26 train and other popu- ;• 
lar methods of escape will answer, "Cer- ;; 
tainly, dear." But alas, I was shocked jj 
and even mortified to find that things jj 
had gotten to such a terrible state that jj 
the teacher actually said, "No!" to such jj 
a request. Think of it — and in this ad- jj 
vanced age, too! jj 
The second point is that a teacher jj 
! should give a student at least A on all jj 
work. Yet I have found papers graded jj 
as low as C. Such conditions are de- jj 
plorable indeed, and should be looked jj 
into. Another point of national inter- :! 
est and world-wide comment, is the jj 
matter of conversation between the j; 
teacher and the pupil. The teacher jj 
should always say little soft things ; such jj 


:l ■• 

ii ii 

| OTILL'O 1 

.^^ PROGRESSIVE J^\ 
^J DRUGGISTS \^J 


ji! Every Inch A Drug Store jj 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED NINE 




At Your Service 

You bring a certain anticipation into 
this store — it's our business to see that 
it is definitely realized. 
Nothing but ioo per cent Service can 
turn Anticipation into Satisfaction. Test 
our store on this basis! See if we don't 
steadily point out your advantages rath- 
er than our own. 

Our Spring Showing of 

Stratford clothes 

FOR THE WELL DRESSED MAN 

deservedly leads in style, fabric and 
tailoring— yet we painstakingly select 
the special model and weave from these 
famous garments that will be most ser- 
viceable to YOU. Same with the ac- 
cessories — the shirt, tie, hat and gloves 
you buy here not only must SATISFY 
— but our selling SERVICE must bring 
you back again and again. 



\^OLFF THE CLOTHIER 
610 East Lincoln Highway 




New 

DeKalb 
Restaurant 

Corner Fourth 

Street and Lincoln 

Highway 

Open Day and Night 



Quick Service 



Telephone 106 



EVERGREENS 

A choice lot of Colorado Blue and 

Green Spruce and 

Concolor Fir in larger sizes 

Naperville 
Nurseries 

Naperville 
Illinois 

Long Distance — Naperville One 

Headquarters for Trees, Shrubs and 
Perennials for your Land- 
scape Work 

PERENNIALS 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED TEN 



What A Teacher Should Be 

(Continued from Page 20Q) 
as, "My dear Miss Blank, what would 
I ever do without you?" or "Really, Mr. 
S S, I can keep you in my class no long- 
er for you know more about psychology 
than I do." Such tid-bits would tend 
to encourage the student somewhat; 
but, I fear that we are still living in the 
dark ages, for repeatedly have I heard 
a teacher say, "If you'll kindly keep 
your thoughts in the class Mr. Blank, 
you might know something sometime!" 
Lastly, let me say, teachers, you are 
old fashioned when you ask a student 
to spend an hour and a half on one les- 
son. Psychologists will tell you that 
the student's mind is unable to concen- 
trate longer than ten minutes on one 
study. All highly modern and efficient 
teachers are adopting the new Beenee 
plan, which allows for the ten minute 
study hour, so why not be modern and 
give the hard worked pupil a chance to 
get some extra dates in during the week? 
Mona M. Bahr. 



HAVE MORE LIGHT 
ON YOUR SUBJECT 



We can furnish you with very at- 
tractive student lamps and any 
other electrical appliances 
you will be in need of 
during your school 
period. 

IF IT'S ELECTRICAL 
WE HAVE IT 




'Electric Work of the Better Kind" 



Any Time 

CALL 709 

and our Taxies will be on 
time, rain or shine. 



Swanson Bro's 

Taxi Cab Co. 

4th and Grove Sts. DeKalb, 111. 



"Exactly" 

"Miss Judd, will you please give us 

your report of the Sudan? 

Exactly What type of peo- 
ple live there? .... Exactly. . . 

. . .Miss Tiger, have you anything 

more to add? Absolutely 

so! Exactly Miss 

Worka, please give us a summary of the 

animals of the Sudan 

Exactly." 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED ELEVEN 



DeKalb County 
Soil Improvement Association 

320 NORTH FIFTH STREET, DE KALB 



A membership organization of over 2,000 DeKalb County farmers 
for the purpose of developing agriculture 



DeKalb County Agricultural 
Association 

320 NORTH FIFTH STREET, DE KALB 



A cooperative association of DeKalb County farmers for the pur- 
pose of handling farm produce and supplies 



DeKalb County National Farm 
Loan Association 

320 NORTH FIFTH STREET, DE KALB 



A Federal chartered corporation to make farm loans through the 
Federal Land Bank and to sell Land Bank Bonds 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED TWELVE 



Bradley Quality Books 

Tell Me Another Story $i-75 The Mermaid's Message i.oo 

From the Children's Hour 1.75 For the Children's Hour, Vol. I.. .60 

Worth While Stories for Every For the Children's Hour, Vol. II.... 60 

Day 1.75 For the Children's Hour, Vol. Ill .60 

Stories Children Need 1.75 In the Child's World 2.00 

For the Story Teller 1.75 Paradise of Childhood 2.50 

Firelight Stories 1.25 Love and Law in Child Training. . 1.50 

All About Johnny Jones 1.25 Rhythmic Action Plays and Dances 2.25 

Folk Stories and Fables 75 Every Child's Folk Songs and 

Every Day Stories 75 Games 2.00 

Hero Stories 1.00 The Children's Year 60 

Once Upon a Time Animal Stories .75 Songs of Happiness 1.75 

Stories of Great Adventures 1.50 Robert Louis Stevenson Songs ... . 1.00 

Broad Stripes and Bright Stars.. 1.50 Mother Goose Songs 1.00 

Stories of Wakeland and Holiday Songs and Every Day 

Dreamland 75 Songs and Games 2.00 

The Children in the Wood Stories 1.25 Primary Manual Work 1.75 

More Mother Stories 1.25 Hand Work 80 

The Adventures of Twinkle What and How 2.50 

Eyes and the Little Black Bear 1.25 Story Telling With the Scissors. . .70 

The Sunken City 75 The Way of the Clay 25 

Any of the above books sent on receipt of price. We make discount to 
schools on quantities. 

Thomas Charles Company 

207 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago 

Northwestern Agents of MILTON BRADLEY CO. 



The Nineteen- Twenty Class 

The freshmen are a studious set, 

They have no fears or cares. 
They wander round quite aimlessly, 

With solemn looks and stares. 
The Juniors are a boisterous bunch, 

Their shouting fills the air, 
They're full of energy and pep, 

And all their secrets share. 
The Seniors are a careworn crowd, 

Their troubles are not few. 
But when at last their work is done, 

They have their good times too. 

Annette Carlson. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED THIRTEEN 




E. A. 

SHETTER 

Jeweler 



We feature the 
celebrated 



R. Wallace 
Silver 
Plated 
Ware 

Watch and Jewelry 
Repairing 



a a. 

ANDERSON 

Hardware 

6 

Students' Needs 
Such as 

Pen Knives, Pocket 

Knives, Safety Razors, 

Scissors, Etc,, a Specialty 



Use Gas for 
Cooking 

The Clean Fuel. 

Use Gas for 
Lighting 

Nearest to Daylight. 



Illinois 
Northern 
Utilities 
Company 



347 East Lincoln 
Highway. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED FOURTEEN 



Traveling Bags 
Suit Cases 

Trunks 
Picture Framing 

Pictures 

K 

WIRTZ 

& 
WIRTZ 



Donations Made to 

Museum 

Mr. Wix Garner, who is very true, 
Leaves the misplaced eyebrow he never 

grew. 
Red Johnson, yes, she has red hair, 
Is leaving a strand to wave in the air. 
Peg Barton, hers is a queenly act, 
She's leaving the candy she gets from 

her Jack. 
Agnes C. Chewning will donate her 

drawl, 
Although never asked to do it at all. 
Grace Miller, who has made much 

scandal, 
Leaves her boisterous spirit for some- 
one else to handle. 
Edith V. Johnson gives an eminent 

choice, 
So we're taking her pleasant but 

squeaky voice. 
Sidney Bristow, the Abe of our school, 
Leaves his stature and height, the hall 

to rule. 



WHO'S YOUR 
BUTCHER ? 

LON M. SMITH 



152 EAST LINCOLN HIGHWAY AND CORNER OF THIRD 
STREET AND LINCOLN HIGHWAY 

DEKALB, ILLINOIS 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED -FIFTEEN 



ft= 



LMMfA 



Jff 




PAGE TWO HUNDRED SIXTEEN 




I wonder, as the clouds roll by- 
Flitting fast across the sky, 

I wonder as the stately trees 
Rustle gently in the breeze, 

I wonder, in the merry Spring 
When all the birds so sweetly sing, 

I wonder if God made these things 
To please us men in happy Spring. 

Dorothy Trow. 



2 B X-ISED 



It's E-Z 2 rite a long S-A 

B-4 U B-gin 2 rite, 

Or 2 compose a PO-M 

That will smiles and tears N-Vite, 

Or 2 rite a simple story, 

Tho' it keeps you up all nite. 

Even if U-R head is M-T 

Of 1 I-D-A brite, 

Put all U-R N-R-G 2 the task, 

It mite kum all rite. 

Remember it's 4 the "Norther," 

And 4-get the task's not lite. 

So U who read this An-U-L, 

Overlook the mistakes U-C. 

If from our path we D-V-8, 

It's the X-P-D-N-C. 

Of the course which we pursU, 

It's the X-P-D-N-C 

U can't expect us 2 X-L 

All others in X-istence, 

Nor can we reach the equal, 

4 technique or consistence. 



So B E-Z there on N-E 1, 
Whose S-A doth amuse, 
N-E poor i's in this Norther 
We pray U 2 E-Q's. 



G. G. 



Books You Should Have 
in Your Library 

"Dope," by Miss Jessica Foster. 

"The Woman in White," by Miss 
Neptune. 

"Spring Song," by Winterhalter. 

"The Naughty Doll," by Lucille 
Young. 

"Finger Plays," by Winifred Maley. 

"Deeds of Danger and Daring, A 
Story of Our Lives," Kathryn Reed and 
D. Du Val. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED SEVENTEEN 



W. M. McAllister T. H. McAllister J. L. Stephenson 

T.H. McAllister & Co. 

INCORPORATED 

DeKalb, Illinois 

Dry Goods Wearing Apparel 

Millinery 




Our Purpose 

— The purpose of this store is to maintain the best service that 
human effort and desire can develop. 

— With this purpose in mind it is our daily concern that mer- 
chandise, methods and salesforce be the best that time, knowl- 
edge and money can procure. 

— We are daily working for your best interest— for this means 
our best interests, too. 

— Our success at all times must be measured from the stand- 
point of your satisfaction, confidence and good will. 



Which helps to makes it "A good place to trade" 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED EIGHTEEN 



Athletics 

A cheer for our athletics of which we 
are so proud, 

T he team is just the very best, we sing 
their praises loud. 

H our by hour we watch them play. 

That time is never a bore, for 
L ively is our lineup, which rushes on 

the floor. 

E agerly we watch each move — here 
and there they rush, 

T ime passes too slowly — there falls a 
breathless hush. 

/ stand in the sidelines fast becoming 
weak. 

C heering for their courage and the 
score that up does creep. 

5 pirit, speed and spunk — and the 
game is ours to keep. 

Cecelia Chewning. 



Northwestern 

Teachers' 

Agency 



Free Enrollment 



The Educational Clearing 

House for the Entire West, 

Alaska, Hawaii 



Home office, BOISE, IDAHO 

Utah office, SALT LAKE CITY, 

UTAH 

California, Hawaii, BERKELEY, 
CALIFORNIA 



Geography 

Teachers who wish to strengthen the 
geography work in their schools will be 
interested in our geography books, out- 
line maps, and geographical pamphlets. 
The following are for the grades: 

Home Geography — A text book for 
beginners in the study of geography, 
covering a full year's work. Price 45c 
postpaid. 

The following are four Reference 
Notebooks to accompany the regular 
text used in the grades, each one cover- 
ing a full year's work. Price 35c each, 
postpaid. 

"World as a Whole," "North 
America," "South America and Eur- 
ope" and "Asia, Africa and Austral- 
ia." 

Special Notebooks for Commercial 
and Physical Geography in High 
Schools. 

Send for a copy of our catalogue 
which gives a list, with descriptions and 
prices of our publications. 

McKnight & McKnight, publishers 
Normal, Illinois 



Senior Superlatives 

Laziest Claude Middleton 

Wittiest Margaret Johnson 

Shyest Gladys Rust 

Sportiest Hazel Anderson 

Most in Love Helen Gundry 

Best Actresses Marion Davis 

Marie Gross 

Best Actor Willard Smith 

Class Midget Helen Olsten 

Class Giant Sidney Bristow 

Fattest Ella Herrmann 

Most Energetic Mildred Julian 

Most Bashful Lottie Hermanson 

Greatest Athlete Ruth Poley 

Most Studious Ellen Luhtala 



page two hundred nineteen 



J*i^*iN^ 



FOOD PRODUCTS 



$ 



« Shield 



of Quality 



'T'HE supreme quality of NONE-SUCH Food Pro- 

-*- ducts spells economy and satisfaction for the 

housewife. Selected from the finest foods that grow, 

and packed with scientific care, NONE-SUCH 

products come to the table with all the delicious, appetizing 
flavor of fresh vegetables and fruits. Over 5,000 varieties are 
packed under the NONE-SUCH Brand. Ask for these qual- 
ity foods next time you order. 

McNEIL & HIGGINS CO. 

Exclusive Distributors NONE-SUCH Food Products 

CHICAGO 



What Mr. Page Might Have 
Said 

Mr. Vaughn reading Article 10: 
"Taruoy noi rik kjlluhkks ai mossback? 
Jffhkamuvi ikjhi Jazz. Viptiski omlib 
omige zime." (Mr. Page clears his 
throat. We think we hear "Amen!") 
Mr. Vaughn explains, "Now, students, 
it simply means ?!:??!* (*) — 
; ? ? !" (irl next to me breaks in 
with, "Why, that isn'twhat Mr. Page 
told me this morning. Why he said 
! !" Mr. Vaughn is almost winded but 
recovers and reads the article on Shan- 
tung: "Zposki rpyu coplip izimoi gezzio 
moibrk not sksipiv. Thurbl narllah 
iksrym-utry." (Another girl, "I really 
do believe Mr. Page is coming down 
with St. Vitus Dance! Look at him!" 
When Senator Lodge says that, he sim- 
ply means, "? ? ! And with a little 
cough and smile he finishes amid looks 
of relief from the faculty on the plat- 
form. 

Glen Halloran. 



J.J. 

Murphy Co, 



♦ o 



204 E. Lincoln Hwy, 

5 to 50c and Variety 
Store 

"Low price Ready-to- Wear" 
our specialty. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED TWENTY 




I mm m p 



u 




When It's Your Turn in General Exercises 



1. A rosy red tint to the face is most becoming. 

2. In addition to the color, little dew-like drops of perspir- 

ation might glisten becomingly on the face,. 

3. A slight waver in the voice gives good effect. 

4. Shaking knees and nervous hands give an air of calm 
aloofness. 

5. Looking at the floor puts your audience at ease. 

6. Speak in a low, cultivated voice as no one wants to hear 
what you say anyway. 

Mona M. Bahr. 



The N. L S. N. S. 
Barber Shop 



ON THIRD STREET 



Our barber work stands all 
inspection. Give us a trial 
and you'll always come back. 



SHINE PARLOR SERVICE 
Telephone 797 



Jack Ulm, 



Proprietor 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED TWENTY-ONE 




Whitman's Famous Chocolates 

TRY A SAMPLER 



Chocolate, Strawberry, New York and 
Maple Nut Ice Creams 

Also a Full Line of Brick Ice Creams 



"You and Your Girl and The Lincoln Inn 
Make a Happy Triangle" 



LINCOLN INN 

Johnston Chocolates Ziegler Chocolates 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED TWENTY-TWO 



SECOR'S 



If you'll give me your attention, 

I'll try to make mention 

Of the clever little inventions 

Found in Secor's Drug Store. 

Post cards, pencils, papers, 

Powders and perfumes galore, 

And to tell you the truth 

His remedies restore youth, 

So buy of him more and more. 

Be it summer or winter, 

Yea, be it spring or fall, 

Just step in and try 

And you'll find it's no lie, that 

Secor's is the best store of all. 

Irma Martin. 



♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ 



S is for soap to make you clean and bright. 

E is for erasers to erase all you write. 

C is for cameras to take pictures within sight. 

O is for the odd things we buy for delight. 

R is for rulers to use every night. 

S is for snap shots developed so bright. 

Frieda Smith. 



Trade at Secor's 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE 



McCann's News Stand 

All the Leading 
Periodicals 

Subscription Agency. 



Mr. C. F. Toenniges Miss F. Toenniges 

TOENNIGES SCHOOL 
OF MUSIC 

Affiliated with Sherwood School of Music, 

Vocal, Instrumental 
Harmony, Ensemble 

137)4 E. Lincoln Highway Telephone 26 




Our Historian 



What's he looking for, do 
you suppose, 

With glasses set astride 
his nose? 

Is he trying to find the 
Senate's Decision? 

Or has one of the "Four- 
teen Points" arisen? 

He comes to the class 
room with springing 
step, 

His eyes a-twinkle and 
full of "pep." 

He always has a joke to 
tell. 

That's why we all like 
him so very well. 

Pearl Murray. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR 



DeKalb Dairy 
Company 

Pasteurized Milk and Cream 
TELEPHONE 9 



Pasteurized Plain and 

Ice Cream Fancy Sherbets 



By These Words Ye Shall Know Them 

"That's what the grammar book says and it's absolutely wrong," Miss 
Whitman. 

"This may pass over your heads, but — " Mr. Wager. 

"Is the time up?" Mr. Parson. 

"We giggled and giggled and giggled," Helen Beebe. 

"How funny," Nora Tully. 

"What would the sentence mean without the commas?" Mr. Lyon. 

"Oh, baby!" Jo Jocelyn. 

"Don't forget your pennies," Ruth Johnson. 

"Honestly, I nearly laughed right in their faces!" Edith Carlson. 

"I can't do this stuff," Geraldine Peterson. 

"Isn't that pleasing?" Miss Simonson. 

"Hope we have something good for supper," Ruth Bollman. 

"Respect the rights of others," Miss Branch. 

"Let's go to Peck's," Ruth Chant. 

"I should smile," Ruth Poley. 

"How's your work coming along?" Helen Corey. 

PAGE TWO Hl'NDRliD TWENTY-FIVE 



Besides being the largest organization in the country specializing on Quality 

College Illustrations, handling over 300 annuals every year, including this 

one, we are general artists and engravers. 

Our Large Art Departments create designs and distinctive illustrations, 

make accurate mechanical wash drawings and birdseye views, retouch 

photographs, and specialize on advertising and catalog illustrations. 

Our photographic department is unusually expert on outside work and on 

machinery, jewelry and general merchandise. 

We reproduce all kinds of copy in Halftone, Zinc Etching, Ben Day and 

Three or Four Color Process ; in fact, make every kind of original printing 

plate; also Electrotypes and Nickeltypes by wax or lead mold process. 

At your service — Any time — Anywhere — for Anything in Art, Photography 

and Photoengraving. 

Jahn & Ollier Engraving G\ 

554 WEST ADAMS STREET* CHICAGO 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED TWENTY-SIX 




JllimilMIMUIWimiMMIIIHIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIHIMIMIMIIIIIIIHIIMMIIIIIIIIIinilllMm 



Sayings of Bright Children 



CLEAR 

Mr. Lyon: "Give the definition of 



| up. 



Miss Jordan: " 'Up' means his head 
is up and his feet are down." 

I 



o 



t 

Mr. Lyon: "Now what is up?" 

GOOD THINKING 
Rose Lundberg: "What do we call 
that process in which vapor forms in 
little drops?" 

Bright Student: "Perspiration." 

SMART BOY! 
Mr. Page: "What good does money 
do?" 



Mr. Faxon: "It enables us to pur- = 

chase things." | 

Mr. Page (holding up a quarter) : | 

"What good is this quarter to me?" | 

Mr. Faxon: "Good for an example." I 

HOW DOES SHE KNOW? [ 

Miss Patten: "What is the differ- | 

ence between a davenport and a chair?" | 

Miss Heath: "More than one per- 1 

son may sit on the davenport at a § 

time." 1 

Miss Patten: "Yes, but a chair is j 

often misused." | 

WHAT DID HE MEAN? [ 

Mr. Parson: "What did you get for | 

the back porch?" | 

Mr. Anderson: "I didn't get as far | 

as the back porch." | 



Lewis & 
Palmer 



Victor Victrolas 
Sonoras 
Records and 
Musical Supplies 



DeKalb 
Illinois 



High Grade Pianos 
Player Pianos 
Grands 



QUALITY 
FIRST 



JEWELRY 

of Quality and 
Dependability 

We consider it a duty 
to show you, for your 
inspection, offerings in 
precious stones, in red, 
green and white gold, 
that will at once be ap- 
preciated for their 
smartness and individ- 
uality. 

C. B. 
Gonterman 



DeKalb, III. 



JEWELER 



HllllllllllillllllliilllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIimiNIIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMMm 

PAGE TWO HUNDRED TWENTY-SEVEN 



Kraft Nelson Swanson 
Company 

Successors to Anderson Bros. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Hart Schaffner & Marx 
Hand Tailored Suits 
and Overcoats. 

Stetson and Longley 
Hats. 

Manhattan and Eagle 
Shirts. 

Stetson and Walk-Over 
Shoes. 

All goods sold must be as represented or 
money refunded. 

We shall be pleased to 
have a call from you. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED TWENTY-EIGHT 



THAT ARISTOCRAT OF WATCHES 

"The Gruen" 

Nothing can prove of greater service and convenience to teacher or student than a 
reliable watch. No watch bears a higher reputation than the Gruen — a reputation 
richly deserved. 




Gruen watches are masterpieces of design as well as of mechanism. You may buy 
a Gruen for little money; you may pay much for one. In either case you get the 
best watch value obtainable. 

J. RENDELL, JEWELER 

Watch Repairing 315 E. Lincoln Highway 



The Dormitory Hash 



The Dormitory Hash 

As judged by those who know, 
Is the very best that's ever served, 

No matter where you go. 
It is really so inviting 

When you once begin to eat, 
You'll never stop until you have 

Cleaned the dish complete. 
There's hash made up in form of sauce, 

There's hash made up in pie, 
And there's hash! and hash! and hash! 
and hash! 

Until you'd think you'd die. 
There's hash for every breakfast, 

And there's hash for dinner, too, 
And supper 's never slighted, 

Without hash, it wouldn't do! 

Edna Jones. 



Columbia 

Coffee & Tea 

Company 

156 E. Lincoln Highway- 
Complete Line of Imported 
China in dinner ware 
and fancy articles 

Also large line of Cut Glass 

COFFEE, TEA, SPICES, 
BAKING POWDER. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED TWENTY-NINE 



BASTIAN BROS, CO, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

CLASS PINS, CLASS RINGS, ATHLETIC MEDALS 

COMMENCEMENT ANNOUNCEMENTS AND 
INVITATIONS, CALLING CARDS 

JEWELERS TO THE CLASS OF 1920 



385 BASTIAN BUILDING 



ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 



MEET ME AT 

SNYDER'S 

SMOKE 

SHOP 

CANDY 
ICE CREAM 
CIGARS 
CIGARETTES 



PHONE 407 FOR 

ATHLETIC 

RETURNS 



Comin' Thru the Halls 

If a body meet a body, 
In our halls of fame. 
If a body greet a body, 
She must be some dame. 



Every lassie has a laddie, 

Nay, they say hai I, 

But, oh! I'll have a grand "posish" 

Up until I die. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED THIRTY 



THE NORMAL LAND BOOK REVIEW 



A 


»1 / 


] ^ 








• ^ 








r^ 


'III HI 


H 


iiil 




£js [i "^ 



Comedy 

"Cosmogny and Evolution," by Rus- 
sell G. Smith. 

In one of his more frivolous mo- 
ments Mr. Smith wrote this small vol- 
ume of two thousand pages and dedi- 
cated it to the world along with his 



other works of art. Mr. Smith's vo- 
cabulary, always most elastic, has ex- 
ceeded all his past efforts so that we 
are grateful for an entertaining little 
novel on this subject. 



Novels 

"Thru the Looking Glass." 

A brief synopsis will give the inside 
facts of this story. "A group of girls 
are sitting about and Mona Bell in her 
favorite position before the mirror is 
patting her hair in place. Mona is talk- 
ing disconnectedly when suddenly she 
gives a wild cry and calls, 'Girls — I can 
see him through the looking glass and 
he is beckoning to me." Mona then 
falls in a faint. "He" is called to her 
side and no longer needs to beckon her 
on. Mona and the professor are mar- 
ried and live happily ever afterward in 
their little bungalow in Malta. 



Ready * to -Wear 



Dry Goods 



Shoes 



"Always a variety without repetition" 



THE RELIABLE 

Famous for Ready-to-wear 
DeKalb, Illinois 



Special attention to Party Costumes and materials. Also Nov- 
elty Coats, Shoes, Neckwear, etc., in fact the new 
items are shown here first. Courteous 
treatment at all times whether 
you purchase or not. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED THIRTY-ONE 



U&&X 




Faculty Song Book 



''Wake Up, America!" Mr. Page 

Just A-Wearyin' for You," Miss Patten 

"Walking the Dog" Miss Gilbert 

"Prepare for Action". . . .Miss Whitman 
"I'm Falling in Love With Someone" 

Mr. Buzzard 

"Slow and Easy" Mr. Wager 

"Daddy Long Legs" Mr. Parson 

"Have A Smile for Everyone You 

Meet" Miss Merritt 

"The Vamp" Miss Parmalee 

"The Sunshine of Your Smile". . . . 

Mr. Gilbert 

"They Go Wild, Simply Wild, Over 

Me" Mr. Ritzman 



"There's No Place Like Home". . . . 

Miss Mann 

"Take Me to the Land of Jazz". . . . 

Mr. Phipps 

"Smiles" Miss Neptune 

"My Fox Trot Girl" Miss Branch 

"You'll Always Be the Same Sweet 

Girl" Miss Youker 

"You'd Be Surprised" Mr. Lyons 

"You're the Girl" Miss Stewart 

"Patches" Mr. Annas 

"Brightenin' the Corner Where You 

Are" Miss Simonson 

Hazel Anderson. 



The Orno 
Shop 



Original designers and 
makers of hand wrought 
jewelry and silverware. 
Imported and domestic 
exclusive art novelties. 
Write to us for any informa- 
tion desired. We will gladly 
make sketches for your ap- 
proval. 

127 East Lincoln 
Highway 

DeKalb. Illinois 
Sorensen 



H. R 

TELEPHONE 472 



Better Dry 
Cleaning 



CARLSON & BENSO 
Cleaners and Tailors 



N 



127 EAST LINCOLN 
HIGHWAY 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED THIRTY-TWO 



9 



w f k^felwJlft^ffl 



3 



We thank you jolly juniors 

For write ups, snaps and jokes. 

And Freshmen, few and lonely 
We'll never call you pokes. 

We thank you, Mr. Parson, 
A home you gave the board. 

"Just walk right in, don't stop to ring- 
What welcome those words afford. 

Miss Merritt too, we thank you, 

For guidance with the art, 
For hours spent on the Norther work — 

In future years 'twill joy impart. 

Miss Simonson, to you we owe 

The tone of all that's writ. 
How often did you think it o'er, 

Ere we changed it bit by bit. 

We thank you faculty and all — 
Photographers and advertisers, 

Who kindly gave a helping hand 

In shaping this good times reminder. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED THIRTY-THREE 



Autographs 



Autographs 



Ws&Mlm 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA